Student Research, 2006

One of the advantages of studying for a degree in the Department of Behavioral Sciences is that you will receive exceptionally good preparation in evidence-based reasoning or research. As such reasoning is essential both to successful professional practice and to advancing knowledge in the various disciplines represented in our department, a strong emphasis has been placed on developing evidence-based reasoning skills in our students. Core to this emphasis are the intro courses we teach in research methods and statistics. For certain majors, more advanced courses are offered as well. Therefore, by the time you finish your degree in our department you will have learned the basics of evidence-based reasoning and research--including how to ask a researchable question, how to critically review previous research on that question, how to go about designing new research to answer the question, and how to submit your findings for peer review through. This includes learning about APA style conventions, about human subject review procedures, about how to prepare PowerPoint presentation summarizing your results, and about how to properly write a research paper so it can be submitted for publication.

Students who are really serious about research have opportunities to work on research projects with our professors, several of whom are internationally renowned researchers in their field of specialization. This gives them a chance to not only learn about a particular field of research, but to co-present and co-publish articles with professors. Such opportunities at the undergraduate level are rare in U.S. higher education, but common in the Behavioral Sciences Department at Andrews. No wonder our graduates are succeeding in getting into some of the finest graduate schools in the country--including Brandeis University, Brown University, Columbia University, Harvard University, Stanford University, the University of Michigan and many other top schools.

July 25, 2006

Dane Sorensen (2006) and his advisor, Dr. Karl Bailey will be presenting the results of his senior research project ("The World is Too Much: Effects of Array Size on the Link between Language Comprehension and Eye Movements") at the 14th Annual OPAM (Object Perception, Attention, and Memory) Conference in November 2006. Dane's presentation will be one of only 15 talks at this one-day conference, and thus represents a significant recognition of his hard work and an opportunity for Dane to interact with an exciting group of scientists. Thanks to a formal association between OPAM and the journal Visual Cognition, a summary of this presentation will also appear in Visual Cognition this fall.

Dane's research focused on the link between spoken language comprehension and eye movements made towards objects present in the listener's field of view. A methodology based on this link has been used in recent years to draw conclusions about spoken language comprehension; however, Dane's project demonstrates that the mere number of objects present in the display can attenuate this link, even if ample time for preview is given. This research has implications, not only for the use of the eye movement-spoken language processing link, but also for the presentation of spoken and visual information in the classroom, and projects in the Andrews University Cognitive Psychology Laboratory are currently being prepared to follow up on these findings during the 2006-2007 school year. This research was made possible by a STEP grant from the National Science Foundation as part of the Behavioral Neuroscience Program at Andrews University.

May 30, 2006

During the school year 2005-06 seven students from the Behavioral Sciences Department had their research accepted for poster presentations at the Midwest Psychological Convention in Chicago, in May, 2006. Two anthropology students, Darrell Rohl and Andrew Gerard, both had their research accepted for poster presentations in Omaha, 2006. Following is a sampling of the research students have done in the past two years.

Jessica Dettmann
Dettmann, Jessica (2006, May). What is the Correlation of Teenage Girls' Attachment to Teen Magazines and their Self-Esteem? Poster session presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL. Oystein LaBianca, Ph.D. was the faculty sponsor.

 

Kern Eason, Jessica Dettman, Sonja Stojanovic
Dettmann, Jessica, Stojanovic, Sonja, Eason, Kern (2006, May). The Relationship between Types of Perfectionism and Anxiety Levels after Experiencing Failure. Poster session presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL. Herbert W. Helm, Jr., PhD, faculty sponsor

 

Andrew Gerard
Gerard, Andrew (April, 2006). The Anthropology of Civilizations: The View from Tell Hesban, Jordan. Annual Meeting of the Central States Anthropological Society. Omaha, Nebraska.

 

Jacque Giem, a junior psychology student, received the PSI Chi Midwest Regional Research Award from the Midwest Psychology Association for her research on "Perception and Extent of Substance Use in a Conservative Christian University with a Prohibitionist Substance Use Policy". Of 300 student submissions, 15 are selected for awards. Duane McBride, PhD,Chair of Behavioral Sciences, faculty sponsor.

 

Williams, A. M. E., Giem, J., & Turk, R. (2005, May).

Gender Differences in Self-Disclosure Through Various Communication Mediums. Poster session presented at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

 

Jennifer Halder, Erich Lichtenwalter, Kanako Miyata

Halder, Jennifer, Lichtenwalter, Erich, Miyata, Kanako (2006, May). Cohesion vs. Flexibility: Comparing the Family Structures of Korean and Causasian-American Families Using the Cirumplex Family Map. Herbert W. Helm, Jr., PhD, faculty sponsor.

 

Karin Karlman

Williams, A. M. E., Karlman, K. I. & Proctor, D. L. (2006, May). A Comparison of the Most Frequently Cited People in Personality and Social Psychology. Poster session presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL. Derrick Proctor, PhD, co-author.

 

Daryl Rohl

Rohl, Darrrell (April, 2006). Global Moments and Local Culture Change in Roman Transjordan. Poster session presented at the Annual Meeting of the Central States Anthropological Society in Omaha, Nebraska. Oystein LaBianca, PhD, faculty sponsor.

 

Rebecca Turk

Williams, A. M. E., Giem, J., & Turk, R. (2005, May). Gender Differences in Self-Disclosure Through Various Communication Mediums. Poster session presented at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Proctor, D. L., Williams, A. M. E., Helm, H., Cook, J., Whatton, D. H., & Turk, R. E. (2005, May). Attending the MPA convention from students' and teachers' perspectives. Poster session presented at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

 

Alisa Williams

  

Williams, A. M. E. & Proctor, D. L. (2006, May). Core Concept Overlap Among the Four Most Frequently Taught Psychology Courses. Poster session presented at the 13th Annual APS-STP Teaching Institute, New York, NY.

Williams, A. M. E., Karlman, K. I. & Proctor, D. L. (2006, May). A Comparison of the Most Frequently Cited People in Personality and Social Psychology. Poster session presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Proctor, D. L. & Williams, A. M. E. (2006, May). The 100 Most Frequently Cited Concepts in the Four Most Frequently Taught Psychology Courses. Poster session presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Proctor, D. L., & Williams, A. M. E. (2005, May). Using core concepts to teach social psychology and raise students' test performance. Poster session presented at the 12th Annual APS-STP Teaching Institute, Los Angeles, CA.

Williams, A. M. E., & Proctor, D. L. (2005, May). Frequently cited concepts in the four most frequently taught undergraduate psychology courses. Poster session presented at the 12th Annual APS-STP Teaching Institute, Los Angeles, CA.

Proctor, D. L. & Williams, A. M. E. (2005, May). Emerging and Fading Concepts Used in Introduction to Psychology Textbooks. Poster session presented at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Williams, A. M. E., Giem, J., & Turk, R. (2005, May). Gender Differences in Self-Disclosure Through Various Communication Mediums. Poster session presented at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Proctor, D. L., Williams, A. M. E., Helm, H., Cook, J., Whatton, D. H., & Turk, R. E. (2005, May). Attending the MPA convention from students' and teachers' perspectives. Poster session presented at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

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