Admissions & Applying

The decision to attend college may be one of the most important ones you'll ever make. Don't worry—we're here to make it easy.

It can be daunting trying to figure out what you need to do to prepare for college. But don't worry! We have you covered. For each year of high school, we have created a list of what you and your parents can do to be prepared for college. 

9th Grade         10th Grade         11th Grade          12th Grade          Parents

9th Grade

The key for this year is the experience. Start getting involved and exploring—consider different career options as you go.

  • In order to help you save for college, estimate your financial aid with a parent using FAFSA4caster. Learn more about FAFSA.
  • Get involved! Volunteer, work or participate in academic programs, camps, etc. It is one way to discover and verify your own interests and also a great way to build up your experience resume for applications.
  • Talk with your guidance counselor or teacher about Advanced Placement courses Andrews offers and see if you are eligible to apply.
  • Research your career options. Read Feature Stories of different careers and degrees our students and alumni have experienced.
  • Begin to look for scholarships.  It's never too early to start looking.
  • Start and continue to update a list of your awards, honors, paid and volunteer work, and extracurricular activities. 

10th Grade

It is never too early to begin thinking about your future and about what you would like to do for a career. 

11th Grade

This is when things become more serious as you plan for college, especially in the summer before your 12th grade year. We have broken down what you need to do in order for you to be prepared.

  • Continue to learn about possible careers
  • Research Andrews University and register for a visit.
  • Get to know your Enrollment Counselor. They are there to help you!
  • Take the PSAT/NMSQT in the fall. You must take the test in 11th grade to qualify for scholarships and programs associated with the National Merit Scholarship Program. 
  • Register for and take standardized tests for college admission. By taking the tests in 11th grade, it gives you an opportunity to retake them and increase your score. Here is more information about Andrews University’s requirements.
  • Continue looking for scholarships.  
  • Compare FAFSA4caster financial aid estimator to the actual costs of colleges to which you will apply.
  • Decide whether you are going to apply for admission to a particular college’s early decision, early action or regular decision program. Be sure to learn about Andrews Early Decision program requirements.
  • In the summer, create a username and password called an FSA ID that you’ll use to confirm your identity when accessing your government financial aid information and electronically signing your federal student aid documents. Learn about the FSA ID, and create yours. Note: You must create your own FSA ID; if your parent creates it for you, that’ll cause confusion later and will slow down the financial aid application process. Check out this page for a tutorial on how to create the FSA ID.
  • For even more information about dual enrollment, homeschooling, and tips for preparing for college, check out the Preparing for College page.

12th Grade

It is crunch time! You are almost done with high school and you will embark on a new adventure in college. 

  • Don’t slack off! Your final semester is still worth something for scholarship eligibility.
  • Get involved with leadership roles.
  • If you haven’t done so already, register for and take the standardized tests required for college admission. Retake any tests you wish to improve your score on. Here is more information about Andrews University’s requirements.
  • Apply to Andrews! Be sure to pay attention to deadlines. 
  • Before completing your FAFSA, you will need to create a username and password called an FSA ID that you’ll use to confirm your identity when accessing your government financial aid information and electronically signing your federal student aid documents. Note: You must create your own FSA ID; if your parent creates it for you, that’ll cause confusion later and will slow down the financial aid application process. Check out this page for a tutorial on how to create the FSA ID.
  • As soon as possible after its Oct. 1 release, complete and submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) and Financial Information Sheet. You should submit your FAFSA by the end of February. After you submit the FAFSA, you should receive your Student Aid Report (SAR) within three days to three weeks. This document lists your answers to the questions on your FAFSA and gives you some basic information about your aid eligibility. Quickly make any necessary corrections and submit them to the FAFSA processor. Here is a tutorial on how to complete your FAFSA.
  • Well before your college application deadlines, ask your counselor and teachers to submit the required documents (e.g., transcript, letters of recommendation) to Andrews. The deadline is July 15 for the fall semester and November 15 for the spring semester.
  • Complete any last scholarship applications.  Consider summer ministry scholarships by working at Summer Camp or selling Megabooks during the summer after your senior year.
  • Last but not least, talk with your Enrollment Counselor! They are there to help you along the way.
  • For even more information about dual enrollment, homeschooling, and tips for preparing for college, check out the Preparing for College page.

Parents

You want the best for your child as they continue to look to the future. The best thing you can do for your child is to be involved. That is why we have put together a few helpful tips of what you can do as you look toward the future.  Don't forget we have a Parents & Supporters page just for you! 

9th Grade:
  • Talk with your child about college plans and assess their interest. Will your child go to college?
  • Be involved with your child’s studies and grades. 
  • Encourage your child to take Advanced Placement and challenging classes.
  • Begin thinking of how your child will pay for college. If you haven’t started, start a college savings account and add to it regularly. 
10th Grade
  • See if your high school has college nights, or financial aid nights and plan to attend. Check out when Andrews Visits You!
  • Help your child discover independence by encouraging him or her to work and take responsibility for homework and other tasks.
  • Learn about the standardized tests your child will be taking in high school.
  • For even more information about dual enrollment, homeschooling, and tips for preparing for college, check out the Preparing for College page.
11th Grade
  • Evaluate if you are on track in saving up money for your child’s college education.
  • Take time to dialogue with your child about the schools he or she is considering and help clarify goals and priorities.
  • Attend college fairs and visit college campuses with your child. Do not take over conversations with college representatives. Be sure to visit Andrews.
  • Encourage your child to begin looking and applying for scholarships.
  • Ask your employer if scholarships are available for children of employees.
  • For even more information about dual enrollment, homeschooling, and tips for preparing for college, check out the Preparing for College page.

12th Grade

  •  Create your own FSA ID if you don’t have one yet. (The FSA ID is a username and password that you will use for signing your child’s FAFSA, Free Application for Federal Student Aid.) Note: You must create your own FSA ID. If your child creates it for you, or if you create your child’s, that will cause confusion later and slow down the financial aid application process. (Need help? You and your child should watch the “How to Create an FSA ID” video.)
  • Work with your child on filling out the FAFSA. Check out these tutorials for help.
  • Make sure your child’s personal information is safe when he or she applies for financial aid. For tips, read Federal Student Aid and Identity Theft.
  • Read IRS Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education to see how you might benefit from federal income tax credits for education expenses.
  • Understand the benefits of federal student loans.
  • Help your child learn about the responsibilities involved in accepting a student loan by reviewing “What should I consider when taking out federal student loans?” with him or her.
  • Look at communication from schools to which your child sent FAFSA information. If a school has offered you or your child Direct PLUS Loans, the Federal Student Loans: Basics for Students and Federal Student Loans: Direct PLUS Loan Basics for Parents booklets might be useful to you.
  • For even more information about dual enrollment, homeschooling, and tips for preparing for college, check out the Preparing for College page.