COVID-19 Reopening Plan

To return to in-person instruction this fall, Andrews University has developed a COVID-19 Reopening plan. This plan is based on three guiding principles: Safety, Community and Inclusivity. These three principles inform the six key components that outline our plan:

 

 

An additional section, Facility Use, provides further details on general facility use and expectations. Offices or departments are responsible to develop and maintain mitigation action procedures unique to their specific area. The University’s plan also factors in guidance from the Berrien County Health Department (BCHD) and expectations for our assigned Region 3 from the State of Michigan’s “MI Safe Start Plan.”

Test and Monitor

As our students, faculty and staff return to our campus in August, we will rely on a variety of approaches to best ensure that we keep each member of our campus community safe:

  • We will have initial COVID-19 testing of all individuals and will rely on a daily health monitoring system.
  • We will periodically and systematically test a rotating set of groups throughout our community.
  • We will utilize a robust contact tracing system.
  • We will ensure individuals who test positive or have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive are quarantined or isolated for the recommended period.

 

The general purpose of the testing protocol and approach selected by Andrews University is to have a single snapshot of every member of our campus, taken within a focused, short period of time, so we can use that common community data point to respond quickly to confirmed cases of COVID-19 and to activate contact tracing and quarantine procedures as needed at the beginning of this school year. 

Providing on-campus testing has been determined to be the most feasible way to ensure all members of our Andrews community have an affordable COVID-19 test available to them with results received prior to face-to-face classes on August 24, 2020.

The University has partnered with an independent lab, Orig3n, to provide COVID-19 testing through the use of a nasal test which uses a nasopharyngeal swab. Initially, all employees and University students will be required to be tested and receive results prior to August 24, 2020, the first day of in-person classes. For those who have been unable to schedule an appointment, please write to covid19@andrews.edu.

Those test results will be communicated to both the individual and the University. Those who test positive will be required to isolate and not access the campus until their recommended period of isolation has ended. Individuals living in University Apartments or the community will be required to stay in their residence. As needed, residence hall students may be temporarily moved into a designated isolation section of campus residential facilities.

Test dates and locations will be assigned to testing groups based on their status (employee/student) and residence (community, residence halls, University Apartments).

After the initial campus-wide testing, any additional testing may be conducted by the University through an individual’s healthcare provider or the Berrien County Health Department.

If a University employee or student tests positive for COVID-19 from a test independent from the University provider, they should follow the directions provided by their test administrator or medical care provider. Employees should report their test status to their immediate supervisor, and students should report their test status to their Student Life dean.

All employees, University students, Andrews Academy students, Ruth Murdoch Elementary School students, RESA students, contractors/vendors, and guests of the campus will be required on a daily basis to self-screen for symptoms and exposure prior to accessing the campus:

  • Employees, University students and Andrews Academy students will conduct their daily screening through use of a designated mobile app or web platform.
  • Contractors, guests and Ruth Murdoch students will conduct their screening independently.
  • Screening must be conducted each day regardless if a student or employee plans to access the campus, including all weekdays, weekends and holidays. Screening should be completed at the beginning of the day before leaving your residence.
  • Screening requirements for employees who work remotely will be determined by individual departments but at minimum must occur prior to the employee accessing the campus, regardless of the duration of their access.

The screening process will include the following:

  • Screening for symptoms:
    • Acute loss of taste or smell
    • Chills
    • Cough/sore throat/congestion or runny nose
    • Digestive symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting or abdominal pain
    • Fatigue, muscle or body aches
    • Fever/feverish (employees/students will be required to record their temperature)
    • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Screening for exposure
    • Close contact with a confirmed/probable COVID-19 case
    • Traveled in the last 14 days to an area with significant community spread of COVID-19

Individuals will be required to take their temperatures daily. On-campus students will be provided with their own thermometer.

In general, individuals who are sick should stay home and not access the campus as a precaution (University residents are asked to remain in their University residence). The screening process will help identify the potential duration that an individual should stay home and any additional measures that should be taken.

Depending on the specific answers, some individuals may also be directed to begin isolation (symptom-based) or quarantine (exposure-based). This will require the individual to not access the campus (excluding their personal University residence) until their isolation or quarantine has ended (see “Monitoring” for further detail).

The University's designated screening system is CampusClear.

Mobile users can download the app through both the Apple App Store or Google Play.

Desktop users can use the CampusClear web platform.

The University’s monitoring process starts with testing and continues with daily screening. Upon notification of a potential case (based on test or screening results), the process will continue with a case management program which focuses on two primary objectives:

  • Infection control and isolation—stopping the transmission risk of the infected individual
  • Contact tracing and quarantine—identifying possible secondary exposures and reducing their transmission risk

For the purposes of this document, the definitions of isolation and quarantine are based on the State of Michigan’s definitions, which follow CDC definitions:

  • Isolation: “A strategy used to separate people who are sick with a contagious illness from those who are healthy. Isolation restricts the movement of people who are ill to help stop the spread of certain diseases. People in isolation may be cared for in their homes, in hospitals, or in designated healthcare facilities.”
  • Quarantine: “Is used to separate and restrict the movement of people who may have been exposed to a contagious illness, but do not have symptoms, to see if they become sick. These individuals may or may not be contagious.”

Individuals who have been identified as COVID-19 probable/positive will be directed by the University to begin isolation immediately. Isolated individuals will be required to not access the campus until their isolation has ended. Individuals living in University residences (Apartments, houses or residence halls) will be required to stay in their residence and may be temporarily moved into an isolation residence/ward.

Individuals who are COVID-19 probable are strongly encouraged to seek COVID-19 testing. To avoid false-negative test results, testing is not recommended until the individual either begins to experience symptoms or it has been at least four to seven days since the last known exposure to a COVID-19 individual.

Individuals may contact the Spectrum Health Lakeland (our local hospital) COVID-19 virtual screening hotline by phone at 616-391-2380.

Additional information on testing is available through the local health department—see BCHD-Testing.

The Berrien County Health Department will be notified of individual cases upon an individual testing positive for COVID-19. This process will occur through both mandatory reporting by the testing laboratory as well as the University providing a report to the health department.

An individual’s isolation will remain in effect (following BCHD guidelines) until the following criteria has been met and pending formal notification of the isolation ending by the University and, if applicable, with additional notice from the health department:

  • At least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared or since the first positive COVID-19 test, if tested; AND
  • At least one day (24 hours) has passed since symptoms have resolved without the use of fever-reducing medications and there is improvement in respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath); OR
  • Under further direction from a health care provider or the Berrien County Health Department

Again, the isolation will end once the individual has been formally notified of the isolation period ending by either the University or the health department.

In addition to isolating an individual, upon notification of a COVID-19 probable/positive individual on campus, the University will also initiate appropriate support services for the individual as well as initiate a cleaning response to affected areas.

Upon notification of a University individual who is COVID-19 probable/positive, the University will use their contact tracing procedures to attempt to identify any individuals who may have been in close contact with the COVID-19 probable/positive individual.

Close contact with a COVID-19 probable/positive individual can include the following:

  • Being within six feet of them for at least 10–15 minutes*
  • Providing care at home to them
  • Having direct physical contact with them (touched, hugged or kissed them)
  • Sharing eating or drinking utensils with them
  • Being sneezed on or coughed on by them or somehow getting their respiratory droplets

*Note that the CDC uses 15 minutes and the BCHD uses 10 minutes.

The use of proper mitigation techniques will also be included in the close contact determination.

Individuals identified as having close contact with a known case will be directed by the University to begin quarantine immediately. Quarantined individuals will be required to not access the campus until their quarantine has ended. Individuals living in University residences (Apartments, houses or residence halls) will be required to stay in their residence. If individuals are or become symptomatic, they may be temporarily moved into an isolation residence.

The Health Department will be notified about individuals who receive a positive test result and may provide additional quarantine guidance to the close contacts.

A close contact will remain in quarantine (following CDC guidelines) until the following criteria has been met and pending formal notification of the quarantine ending by the University and, if applicable, with additional notice from the Health Department:

  • 14 days after their last contact with the COVID-19 probable/positive individual; OR
    • Note: Calculated as 14 days + day of exposure. For example, if exposed on 9/1/20 at noon, would not be able to return to campus until 9/15/20 at noon.
    • Remember that symptoms can begin 2–14 days after exposure
  • Upon a negative test result from the COVID-19 probable individual; OR
  • Under further direction from a healthcare provider or the Berrien County Health Department

Again, the quarantine will end once the individual has been formally notified of the ending by the University and potentially the health department.

If a quarantined individual becomes symptomatic, the infection control process may start for them, and that individual may transition from quarantine to isolation.

Mitigation

As students, faculty and staff return to our campus in August, we will rely on a variety of approaches to help best ensure that we keep each member of our campus community safe:

  • We will expect physical distancing to remain the norm.
  • We will ensure all students and employees have face coverings and will have guidelines for their use.

The University’s mitigation plan is divided into actions that apply to the entire campus and then actions unique to specific areas of campus. This section only includes details on campus-wide actions. For area-specific actions, please review the appropriate sections (such as “Study,” “Connect,” “Life,” “Work” or “Move Around”).

The mitigation plan has a multi-faceted approach and is a shared responsibility between the University, employees, students, contractors and our guests. The success of this plan depends on the implementation of all aspects by each member of our campus community.

 

Andrews University’s mitigation and response plan will follow the applicable directives of the State of Michigan’s Safe Start Plan.

These directives are based on the different economic engagement phases (1-6) of the pandemic and are applied to specific regions of the State. For economic engagement phases, Andrews University is located in Region 3. These phases are primarily identified by executive orders issued by the Governor of the State of Michigan. The phase status of each region is also available through the State of Michigan's Public Guidance site, which includes a map and summary of executive orders.

The State of Michigan also reports the COVID-19 transmission risk levels (1-6) which are also applied to specific regions of the state. For risk levels, Andrews University is located in the Kalamazoo Region on the MI Safe Start Map (which shows what risk level each region is in).

It should be noted that the economic engagement phases (which identify directives on gatherings, in-person instructions, etc.) may not coincide with the transmission risk levels (where the phase number and risk number could be different). 

The economic engagement phases laid out in the State’s plan are as follows:

  • Phase 1 - Uncontrolled Growth
  • Phase 2 - Persistent Spread
  • Phase 3 - Flattening
  • Phase 4 - Improving
  • Phase 5 - Containing
  • Phase 6 - Post-Pandemic

In the State’s plan, some items, like physical distancing and face coverings, are required in all active phases (excluding Phase 6). Other items are phase-specific, such as in-person instruction (allowed to occur in phases 4-6). The following table highlights some of these phase-specific guidelines

Phase

Instruction

Gatherings Outdoor Recreation
1 Remote Only Not Permitted Walking, hiking, biking permitted
2 Remote Only Not Permitted Walking, hiking, biking permitted; additional
recreation allowed, including golfing and motorboating
3 Remote Only Not Permitted Walking, hiking, biking, golfing, boating permitted
4 In-Person Allowed Limited to small groups with social distancing* Walking, hiking, biking, golfing, boating permitted; activities permitted in small groups with social distancing
5 In-Person Allowed  Increased but still limited-sized groups with social distancing** All outdoor recreation allowed
6 In-Person Allowed

No major limitations

No major limitations

* When Region 3 was in Phase 4, MI Executive Order 2020-110 provided the following guidelines [06/01/20]: Indoor gatherings may not exceed 10 people, outdoor gatherings may not exceed 100 people.
**When Region 6 & 8  was in Phase 5, MI Executive Order 2020-115 provided the following guidelines [06/05/20]:  Indoor gatherings may not exceed 50 people, outdoor gatherings may not exceed 250 people. Indoor event spaces may operate at 25% occupancy or max 250, whichever is smaller. Outdoor event spaces may operate at 25% occupancy or max 500, whichever is smaller.

General Expectations

As an institution of higher education, we must all be committed to learning about the impact of COVID-19 and how we, as a Christ-centered community, can show care to our neighbors by taking individual responsibility in reducing the risk of transmission for all.

Individual Learning
All on-campus individuals are expected to take the initiative to familiarize themselves with COVID-19 related information and, due to the ever-changing nature of COVID-19, should continue to seek updated information. At minimum, individuals should be familiar with the following:

  • COVID-19 Symptoms
    • Acute loss of taste or smell
    • Chills
    • Cough/sore throat/congestion or runny nose
    • Digestive symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting or abdominal pain
    • Fatigue, muscle or body aches
    • Fever/feverish (employees/students will be required to record their temperature)
    • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
    • For more information or further updates: CDC-Symptoms
  • COVID-19 Transmission Risks
    • Respiratory droplets expelled from a COVID-19 positive person when they cough, sneeze or talk that then land in the mouth/nose of others
      • It should be noted that COVID-19 can be spread by a person who is contagious but asymptomatic. As a precaution, individuals should assume that people without symptoms are likely to or may carry the virus and are capable of transmission. Current research shows that 40% to 45% of the spread of COVID-19 comes from asymptomatic individuals. Individuals should maintain physical distance from others, including those that are asymptomatic.
    • Transmission risk can be increased by the following:
      • Proximity (under six feet/two meters) to the individual
      • Time of exposure to the individual
      • Individuals not wearing face coverings
    • Transmission can occur through surface contact, but this is not currently believed to be the primary route of transmission.
    • Individuals are directed to stay home if they are sick.
    • For more information or further updates: CDC-Transmission
  • COVID-19 Prevention
    • Physical distance
    • Hygiene
    • Face coverings such as a mask
    • For more information or further updates: CDC-Prevention
  • University’s Covenant of Care (summarized below)
    • Care for Myself
      • Conduct a daily health screening
      • Practice good hygiene
      • Practice healthy habits
    • Care for Others
      • Practice physical distancing
      • Wear appropriate face coverings
      • Stay home if sick
    • Care for the Andrews Community
      • Clean and sanitize shared common equipment and spaces
      • Participate in testing and contact tracing
      • Observe instructional signage and directives

Provided by the University

The University’s primary source of COVID-19 education will be provided by the University’s framework and policy documents.

Education will also include increased signage throughout the campus that covers topics such as the following:

  • Building Expectations
    • Requirement to wear a face covering/mask when:
      • Unable to consistently maintain a separation of six feet/two meters from others
      • In common spaces (hallways, lobbies, classrooms)
    • Physical distancing (six feet/two meters) should be maintained at all times
    • Practicing good health hygiene (wash hands, cover mouth, avoid touching face)
  • Entrance Screening
    • Reminders to on-campus employees/students to complete their daily Kallaco screening on a designated mobile app or web platform.
    • Notification to guests/visitors/contractors that they are required to self-screen and should not enter campus buildings if they answer yes to any of the posted screening questions
  • Physical Distancing
    • Reminders to maintain physical distancing at all times
  • Hygiene
    • Reminders to practice healthy hygiene such as washing hands, covering mouth for cough/sneeze and avoiding touching mouth/nose
  • PPE Requirements
    • Reminders that a face covering/mask is required to be worn when unable to physically distance and/or in community spaces (hallways/classrooms/restrooms)
    • Exceptions granted for individuals working in their private office, individuals lecturing, or individuals eating/drinking
  • Facility Modifications
    • Max occupancy
      • To maintain physical distancing, reducing occupancy in public areas such as lobbies, lounges and study areas
    • Designation of entry/exit points
      • For classrooms with multiple entrances, entry/exit will be identified to a specific entrance(s)
    • Elevator occupancy
      • To maintain physical distancing, reducing occupancy in elevators to one passenger at a time, with variance allowed for individuals who live in the same household or are care aides for individuals with accessibility needs
    • Areas/items temporarily closed
      • To maintain physical distancing or reduce transmission risk, areas/items may be closed (couches, drinking fountains, etc.)
    • Restroom etiquette
      • Use alternating sinks
      • Use alternating urinals in the men’s restrooms
      • Avoid congregating in lines or small groups
    • Water bottle fill stations
      • To reduce transmission risk, reduce physical contact and keep volume in the water bottle low enough to avoid splashing when filling

Digital PDF versions of University signage are available through Campus Safety for University use.

General Expectations

While general cleaning processes will continue, extra steps for disinfecting will also be taken.
Regardless of who is performing the disinfecting activity, there are basic objectives that should be considered when planning or performing custodial work specific to COVID-19:

  • The chemicals used should be rated to disinfect COVID-19.
  • Attention should be paid to the chemical’s COVID-19 dwell time rating and its average evaporation time.
    • Dwell time: The length of time required for the chemical to disinfect COVID-19, where the chemical must remain visibly wet on the surface being cleaned for that length of time
    • Note: The majority of regular cleaning chemicals will evaporate (average of 2–3 minutes) before the COVID-19 dwell time (typically 10 minutes) has been reached. Ideally, chemicals used for disinfecting COVID-19 should have a dwell time of 2–3 minutes (to coincide with the typical evaporation rate).
  • Disinfecting priority should be given to high frequency touch-point areas such as door knobs/handles, handrails, countertops, restroom controls or other hand-controlled items.
  • Ensuring that appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is available where required.
    • Note: The University's standard COVID-19 disinfecting chemical (in ready-to-use/RTU dilution) does not have any hazards identified in the manufacturer supplied Safety Data Sheet (SDS) and, as such, does not require PPE for use.

Custodial Offices

The University’s Custodial offices (whether Custodial Services, Residence Life custodians or K–12 custodians) are, at minimum, responsible for the following areas (where the area-specific custodians may have additional responsibilities):

  • Classrooms
  • Common spaces (hallways, stairways)
  • Primary doorways (entrances, corridors)
  • Restrooms

Custodial Services is also responsible to help maintain the University supply of disinfecting chemicals/equipment. Individual departments/offices requiring a resupply of COVID-19 related chemicals/equipment should coordinate with the Office of Custodial Services.

Academic/Service Departments

Individual offices/departments are responsible to disinfect:

  • Individual offices
  • Offices/lobbies
  • Some aspects of classrooms (including lectern/presentation equipment)

Offices/departments should use their Return to Work Plans and ensure that the described disinfecting procedures are maintained. This can include the following:

  • Ensuring that chemicals/equipment are in stock (submitting requests to Custodial Services when needed)
  • Identifying and training employees designated to disinfect specific areas or equipment
  • Considering public posting of cleaning/disinfecting schedule/frequency

Students

Students are responsible to:

  • Clean and disinfect their own residential spaces
  • Disinfect their own classroom desk/station (with University-provided supplies)

Each student will be issued a personal-use four ounce spray bottle to disinfect their immediate areas. Personal disinfectant bottles can be refilled at any of the following locations:

  • Bookstore
  • Buller Hall – Outside the School of Social & Behavioral Sciences office (2nd Floor)
  • Halenz Hall – Chemistry Department (2nd Floor)
  • Residence Halls (at the front desks of Lamson Hall, Meier Hall and University Towers)
  • Seminary – In the Dean’s Office Suite

These refill stations will distribute 3M’s Disinfectant Cleaner RCT #40. Further information on the disinfectant is available online.

General Expectations

Some of the most effective tools against the spread of the virus are simple personal safety and hygiene practices. Everyone has a role to play in slowing the spread and protecting themselves, their family and our campus community.

University Role

The University’s role in promoting healthy hygiene includes providing education on good hygiene habits and providing hand sanitizer in two forms:

  • Increased contactless hand sanitizer stations equipped with alcohol-based solution with priority placed on exterior entrances, central locations between classrooms, and outside/near restrooms
  • Initially issuing individual-use hand sanitizer to students for their personal use; students will be responsible for refills or replacements
  • Closure of drinking fountains and increase use of water bottle fill stations

Individual Role

Our personal role in healthy hygiene includes:

  • Washing our hands often, using soap and water, for a minimum of 20 seconds
  • When soap/water is not available, using hand sanitizer
  • Avoiding touching our eyes, nose and mouth
  • Always covering our mouth and nose when we sneeze or cough, using a tissue or the inside of our elbow

General Expectations

Wearing the appropriate COVID-19 based PPE is a requirement of the University’s mitigation plan. This section specifically applies to COVID-19 related PPE and does not include PPE requirements unique to a specific academic hazard (labs/clinical setting) or work hazard.

Please note that when referring to members of the same household or residence, this includes individuals who are currently identified as:

  • Residence hall roommates or suitemates
  • Those living in the same apartment or household (regardless of familial relationship)

For more information or further updates on PPEs: CDC-Face Coverings.

Requirements

The primary PPE requirement is the use of a face covering or mask. All individuals (employees, students, guests and contractors) must wear a face covering/mask when:

  • Unable to consistently maintain a separation of six feet/two meters from others (both indoors and outdoors) outside of the same household/residence
  • Inside buildings, especially in common spaces (hallways, lobbies, classrooms, etc.)
  • Note: Variances to this requirement include during food consumption or for an individual in the act of lecturing/presenting

A face covering/mask is not required when an individual is:

  • Alone in a private room (office/residence) or a vehicle
  • In a private room/vehicle with members of the same household/residence
  • Participating in specific athletic activities (swimming or vigorous physical activity)
  • Outdoors and consistently maintaining a separation of six feet/two meters from others apart from those of the same household/residence
  • Note: Specific directions for various athletic activities will be provided by the event/space manager

A face covering/mask should not be worn under the following circumstances. Further statements of face covering requirements in this document will also include these exceptions:

  • An individual is under the age of two
  • An individual has a healthcare provider approved medical condition
  • An individual has trouble breathing
  • An individual is unconscious, incapacitated or unable to remove their mask without assistance

Typically, face shields should not be used in place of a face covering/mask. There are, however, two occurrences where face shields are allowed as the only barrier:

  • When an individual is unable to medically wear a face covering/ mask
  • When an individual is in the active process of presenting/lecturing—a face covering/mask should then be worn the rest of the time (when a face covering is required)

For more information on face shields, please refer to CDC-Face Shields.

Issuance

The University will provide two reusable cloth face coverings/masks to each on-campus employee and student.

These reusable cloth face coverings/masks will initially be issued through department supervisors (employees) or at the time of campus-wide COVID-19 testing (students).

Visitors, guests and contractors are expected to provide their own masks while accessing the campus.

Replacement or additional masks are not available through the University at this time.

Design, Use and Care

The design, use and care of a face covering/mask should include the following.

A face covering/mask should be designed to:

  • Be kept securely in place (using ear loops, straps, etc.)
  • Include multiple layers
  • Allow for breathing without restrictions
  • Be able to be laundered

A face covering/mask should be worn:

  • Securely against the face
  • Covering both the mouth and nose

Putting on/removing:

  • Wash/sanitize hands before handling
  • Avoid touching the front of the face covering
  • Do not touch eyes, nose or mouth when removing
  • Wash/sanitize hands immediately after removing

When caring for a mask:

  • Store it under the owner’s control to prevent use by others
  • Launder routinely
  • Replace if damaged

General expectations

Individuals on campus should maintain physical distance of at least six feet/two meters apart. Where there is limited space/access (such as an elevator or narrow sidewalk), priority should be given to those with accessibility needs, medical concerns, or childcare.

When individuals are eating (having removed their masks) physical distance should be a minimum of six feet/two meters.

Physical distance expectations apply to individuals of different households or residences (where those of the same household/residence do not have a physical distance expectation).

Building
When inside a University building, physical distancing should occur through the following methods:

  • Avoid congregating in lines or small groups
  • Reduced occupancy (see “Facility Use” section for specific information)
  • When using restrooms
    • Use alternating sinks
    • Use alternating urinals/stalls
    • Avoid congregating in lines or small groups
  • When in hallways/stairways, walk on the right hand side to create physical distance

Campus Grounds

In general outdoor activities, the campus is encouraged to maintain physical distancing that is appropriate for the setting, giving consideration for the typical decrease in length of exposure and the increase of air circulation. Additionally, in determining physical distancing for use of sidewalks, or other paths of travel, priority should be given to those with accessibility needs.

For organized outdoor events, event planning should include physical distance requirements based on the mobility of the event attendees.

  • For events where attendees remain stationary for 15 minutes or more, a minimum distance of six feet/two meters is required.
  • For events where attendees may be mobile or remain stationary for less than 15 minutes, attendees may be at a minimum distance of four feet/1.2 meters or more from each other.

Dining Services

Bon Appétit Management Company, our campus food service provider, is implementing rigorous sanitation and service measures to ensure students can dine with us safely and comfortably.

In accordance with the University’s risk mitigation plans related to the restriction of guests on campus until the State of Michigan returns to pre-pandemic operations, Dining Services will not be available to serve off-campus guests until the State of Michigan MI Safe Start Plan returns to pre-pandemic operations (Level 6). However, Dining Services (Terrace Café and the Gazebo) will be available for all Andrews University students, faculty and staff as well as their immediate family members currently living in their own household. Students, faculty and staff are permitted to purchase additional take-out meals.

These new health and safety measures and requirements have been developed based on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the State of Michigan, the Berrien County Health Department, as well as health and sanitation experts from Bon Appétit’s Coronavirus Response Team. These health and safety measures will be used for both daily operations as well as any catering events. These measures include but are not limited to:

  • COVID-19 specific training for all staff designed by sanitation experts and updated regularly as new issues emerge. Topics covered include proper disinfection, the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), physical distancing protocols and more. These are integrated with food safety and sanitation protocols. Team members wear “I’m Trained” buttons to let students know the team member is up-to-date on all safety measures.
  • Pre-shift wellness screenings for employees in alignment with local regulations, which include no-contact temperature scans and daily interview questions.
  • A decision tree and step-by-step action plan for unit managers who have employees who are sick or who may have had contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19.
  • Employees will wear masks and gloves at all times, preparing and serving food in as contact-less a way as possible.
  • Amped-up cleaning and sanitation schedules with clearly detailed procedures that meet or exceed all local guidelines and national best practices. This includes frequent disinfection of high-touch surfaces.
  • No-touch sanitation stations at entrances.
  • Face coverings will be required in all areas of the Campus Center, the Gazebo and the Terrace Café, the receiving or pick-up area, while waiting in line and moving in the servery, until seated and physically distanced from other diners and again when exiting the facility.
  • Facilitating a physical distance environment with wayfinding signage, expanded meal hours to reduce waiting times, limited indoor dining room capacity with table shields, and outdoor dining options when feasible.
  • Protective infrastructure such as Plexiglass barriers at cashier stations and in front of Café stations.
  • Shifting from self-service to full-service/associate-serviced processes. Self-serve breakfast, salad and deli bar choices will be replaced with freshly made, prepackaged, to-go options including (associate-served) pizza and desserts and disposable serveware that will comply with recommended health and safety practices.
  • In the Terrace Café the tables have been moved to create more distance in dining areas, including Plexiglass dividers for physically distanced seating.
  • The Gazebo will feature contactless ordering and payment via the GET Food app (Android and IOS versions available).
  • Note: For further information related to food allergies and food preparation please refer to Bon Appetit’s general information on food allergens as well as contact Dining Services at ds@andrews.edu.
  • Note: These general plans for Dining Services operations may be adjusted as safety guidelines evolve toward normal operations.
  • Note: More information is available through Bon Appétit.

Regarding residence hall student meal plans:

  • With the fall schedule offering classes on traditional Labor Day and October breaks, residence hall students are strongly encouraged to remain on campus on all weekends and consistently use their meal plan for approximately 14 weeks from Sunday, August 16, through November 24. The 2020–2021 meal plan per semester is $1,850 and does not reflect an increase from 2019–2020 rates. Residents who leave campus on November 24 for the remainder of the semester and have up to $100 remaining on their meal plan are eligible to receive up to $100 credited to their student account.
  • The limited number of residents who remain in the residence halls until the semester ends on December 10 will be able to use any remaining balance on their meal plan up to December 14 or add additional credit to their meal plan, if needed.

Individual Consumption

Regardless of how food is provided, individuals eating with others outside of their household should follow safe practices that reduce transmission risks between the individuals:

  • Do not share eating/drinking utensils.
  • As face coverings will not be used during consumption, maintain physical distance requirements and avoid sitting in a manner that faces each other (unless six feet/two meters apart).

Events, Potlucks or Small Gatherings:

Individuals or departments/clubs seeking to provide food for either on-campus personal gatherings, such as a potluck, or on-campus events, must adhere to the following:

  • Attendance of personal events must follow State restrictions including maximum occupancy, physical distancing, etc.
  • Home-prepared food and buffet style service is not permitted.
  • Food may be provided under the following circumstances:
    • Catered by Dining Services OR
    • Commercially prepared and packaged for individual use—utensils should not be shared.
  • All food service plans should follow CDC guidelines.

For further information on COVID-19 related food safety: CDC-Food & COVID19.

In the event that there is an increased spread or risk of spread for COVID-19 in our campus or local community, the University may reduce or temporarily suspend in-person instruction. This decision will be based on the status of multiple factors that can include:

  • Berrien County Health Department recommendations
  • The MI Safe Start Phase for the Kalamazoo Region/Region 3
    • (Where, in Phases 1–3, in-person instruction would not be allowed)
  • Capacity of local hospitals and on-campus isolation residences
  • Assessment of local infection rates
  • Different assessments of the on-campus spread
    • The area(s) of spread on-campus, including specific departments/offices or residences
    • The quantity of spread, including percentage of on-campus students and/or employees
    • The rate of spread (reproduction rate or R-Value) in the local community, calculated as the average number of people one person can pass the virus on to
    • Campus ability to effectively contact trace (in coordination with the Health Department)

State statistics on COVID-19 can be found through Michigan’s COVID-19 Data site.

U.S. and state statistics on COVID-19 can be found through the CDC’s COVID-19 Data site.

Study

As we begin to study together as a University community, we will be taking a variety of steps to help ensure that the learning process, and available options, will reflect the needs of our students, faculty and staff while keeping them safe:

  • We will arrange classrooms and laboratories to ensure appropriate physical distancing is possible and use face coverings as much as is feasible.
  • We will encourage faculty and staff to replace office visits with colleagues or students with virtual visits or visits in larger spaces.
  • We will make it possible to continue studies or teaching in a remote format when needed for faculty or students.
  • We will make all reasonable attempts to accommodate other unique teaching and learning needs of individuals that may result from COVID-19. Michael Nixon, our vice president for Diversity & Inclusion, will oversee this process to confirm and respond to documented teaching, working and learning needs as Andrews University reopens. To document those concerns and request accommodation, please submit the appropriate form for students or employees (faculty and staff). We will develop classroom and shared study space etiquette to maintain clean and safe spaces.

 

Reducing the transmission risk in a classroom environment involves three major factors: the physical modifications to the classroom and the actions of faculty and students.

Classroom Modifications
While attending classes, individuals will notice the following modifications to the classroom:

  • Classrooms with multiple entrances will have entrances/exits designated to reduce congestion of students entering/exiting at class change.
  • Classroom occupancy will be reduced by 50 percent. Achieving this reduction could involve any of the following:
    • Designation of alternating seats in the classroom
    • New layout of chairs, desks or tables
    • Temporary closure of some seats or lab stations
  • Classroom seating will face in the same direction.
  • Course locations (typical to specific departments or majors) may be reassigned to new buildings/classrooms that can accommodate the required occupancy using physical distancing.
  • Classrooms with limited lecture space may have sections of the front row seating closed to create physical distance between seating and lecture space.
  • Access to classrooms outside of the regular class schedule may be reduced or restricted.

Faculty General Expectations

Faculty can help reduce transmission risks by the following:

  • Decrease high-frequency touch points
    • Reduce use of hard-copy materials (syllabus, sign-up/attendance sheets)
    • Avoid sharing classroom supplies or equipment (dry-erase markers, presenter controls, computer)
    • Faculty should prop classroom doors open for students’ entry/exit
  • Promote physical distancing
    • Stagger the dismissal of classes by individual rows to prevent students from congregating/lining up at the exit
    • Discourage students from congregating:
      • Around faculty after class, while encouraging students to instead seek faculty input through remote means
      • At the classroom entrances, while encouraging students to follow the designated entry/exit locations
    • While lecturing, faculty should maintain physical distance from students
    • Require students to use assigned chairs/stations that are physically distanced
  • Promote a sanitized environment
    • Sanitize equipment controls and contact points between uses and/or classes
    • Remind students to clean their own desk or station
  • Promote use of proper PPE
    • Faculty should wear a face covering or mask while entering/exiting the classroom
    • Face shields may only be worn while the faculty is presenting or lecturing
    • Students are required to continue wearing a face covering or mask
      • Note: With variances to those with approved accommodations
  • Support contact trace efforts
    • Maintain attendance logs
    • Use assigned seating

Student General Expectations

Students can help reduce transmission risks by the following:

  • Avoid use of high-frequency touch points
    • Wait for faculty to prop classroom doors open for entry/exit
    • Come to class prepared with necessary materials or equipment to prevent the need to share physical items (pens, papers, books, etc.)
  • Promote physical distancing
    • Follow classroom signage regarding entry/exit
    • Sit in assigned, distanced seating
    • Avoid congregating in groups around faculty or at classroom entrances
    • Follow class dismissal procedures
    • While transitioning between classes, students should walk on the right side of the hallway
  • Promote use of proper PPE
    • Continue to wear a face covering or mask while in the classroom
      • Variance allowed to students who are presenting and able to maintain physical distance
  • Promote a sanitized environment
    • Remember to spray their own chair or station with provided cleaning chemical during class dismissal, so as to allow enough dwell and evaporation time before the next class or students arrive
  • Promote contact trace efforts
    • Complete attendance records
    • Follow assigned seating

In addition to general academic expectations, there may be additional risks and mitigation steps unique to the different learning environments on campus, such as lab-based instruction, athletics or music. Faculty teaching in these environments will continue to coordinate their risk assessment and mitigation plans with their departments and use identified best practices.

During the course of the day, students will have opportunities to study and prepare for courses independently of the class schedule, period or faculty. These opportunities can involve the use of labs led by a teacher’s assistant, study rooms or access to building-based academic equipment (computer labs, video editing suites, drafting tables, or machine/wood shops).

Traditionally, these opportunities have also afforded collaborative learning with other students, providing a personal and meaningful learning experience beyond the classroom or textbook. While the University is committed to continuing these experiences, we do also want to promote a safe learning environment that reduces transmission risks at this time.

When students are engaged in personal study outside of the classroom, they are expected to continue to use the appropriate mitigation steps that can include the following:

  • Schedule use of academic equipment or study spaces (to promote physical distancing)
  • Avoid congregating in groups and promote use of other remote interaction methods
  • Maintain physical distancing (six feet/two meters)
  • Continue to wear face coverings or masks
  • Clean equipment after personal use
  • Allow furniture to remain in arranged layout (designed to promote physical distancing)
  • While interacting with students outside of the scheduled classroom, consider the ability to effectively contact trace (identify potential secondary exposures) should any of the students become sick in the following days. Students may consider recording or noting who they have studied with and when.

A student’s academic interactions outside of the classroom are an important support function of the University. To reduce transmission risk, a student’s method in interacting may be modified based on the type of interaction. In the majority of cases, students should plan to initiate contact with student support services through remote means such as email, phone, or Zoom meetings. Subsequent interactions will be based on the student services provided and will be communicated with the student after the initial contact.

For a full list of student services, please see the Current Students resource section of the Andrews University website.

Students requesting academic accommodations (such as only online learning or hybrid learning) should first work with their academic advisor to identify options specific to their academic program. Accommodation requests can be made on two bases; either medical-based or general safety. Requests will be reviewed for approval.

Students can also request assistance in navigating their accommodation request by completing this form, which will be reviewed by Michael Nixon, vice president for Diversity & Inclusion.

Medical-Based:
Medical-based requests could be based on the following:

  • A health condition that causes immunodeficiency or a high-risk category which makes someone more susceptible to contracting COVID-19
  • Living with a family member/person who has a health condition that causes immunodeficiency which makes them more susceptible to contracting COVID-19
  • Being a caretaker for and will be living with a family member/person who has a health condition that causes immunodeficiency which makes them more susceptible to contracting COVID-19

Please note that medical documentation should also be submitted to Student Success.

Safety-Based:

Safety-based requests are based on an individual’s personal safety concerns that may not be medically related. These concerns should be discussed with the academic advisor or with VP Nixon to determine the best course of action.

Connect

We’ll also gather together as a community outside of class, through spiritual, social and physical activities, and will rely on these guidelines to assure a safe community:

  • We will ensure that the sizes of various groups meeting together reflect and support the current expectations outlined by the State of Michigan and Berrien County and that physical distancing can be maintained wherever groups gather.
  • We will seek to find activities with friends and colleagues that, through physical distancing and/or the use of face coverings, will make these new activities and options enjoyable and safe.
  • In our worship gatherings, our social activities and our recreational activities, we will seek to build community and engagement in new and creative ways.
  • Students are encouraged to utilize our outdoor grounds, including our beautiful campus arboretum venues, as much as possible.
  • Attendance should be taken for all gatherings to assist the University with contact tracing as may be needed.
  • In our counseling and student support services we will look for larger spaces and/or virtual means to connect meaningfully.

 

Worship and nurturing the spiritual life of our students remains a critical priority. We will seek faith-building opportunities that inspire discipleship in both smaller in-person and dynamic virtual settings throughout the week and on Sabbath mornings.

Worship attendees will be asked to wear face coverings/masks and to maintain physical distancing expectations. University employees and students will be required to check-in for attendance to assist with contact tracing. Guests are encouraged to check-in as well.

At this time, there will be no congregational singing.

Guidelines for praise teams, choirs, and vocal ensembles

  • Rehearsal:
    • Rehearsals should be conducted in rooms that are well ventilated and allow for each. rehearsal participant to maintain 6ft of physical distancing between each other. 
    • Rooms with high ceilings are preferred.
    • Rehearsal time should be kept to a maximum time of 30 minutes or less.
    • All musicians and vocalists are required to wear well-fitting face masks. Gators and face shields are not allowed substitutes.
    • Any instrument bell must use a soft covering
    • To help with contact tracing, rehearsals must keep an attendance record.
      • All participants will check-in with the designated leader.
      • Check-in will include the participant's name, AUID#, phone number, and email address.
  • Live Worship Event/Performance:
    • All musicians and vocalists are required to wear well-fitting face masks. Gators and face shields are not allowed substitutes. 
    • Any instrument bell must use a soft covering.
    • Participants must maintain physical distancing to the extend the location will allow.
    • Participants must participate in attendance records.
    • Song sets should not exceed 30 minutes.

 

Co-curricular expectations will continue to be approximately two programs each week (with a maximum of 26 for the shortened fall semester), emphasizing flexibility with smaller group venues, live streaming, multiple virtual venues, as well as service learning opportunities to fulfill these expectations.

Social activities will focus on fostering friendships and building community engagement in new and creative ways with an emphasis on smaller group venues. 

Student clubs and organizations are encouraged to work with sponsors and the Office of Student Activities & Involvement to plan in-person events according to public health and facilities protocols or utilize a variety of virtual platforms. Attendance must be taken at all in-person meetings and events to allow for contact tracing if needed. Student group travel as well as off-campus events will not be permitted this fall. Similarly, due to the University's limitations on guests to the campus, external speakers/performers requiring travel will not be permitted for in-person engagements, though they can be contracted for virtual events. 

Chaplains, counselors, Student Life deans and support staff will continue to be available to students, in both larger indoor or outdoor spaces as well as through virtual means. Meeting in small, personal office spaces will be discouraged. Students can connect to these services through the Thrive Remotely website. 

Live

A return to in-person instruction means that we will be intentional about how we each live and share spaces safely this fall semester:

  • We will have an education process for all students and employees to encourage and reinforce safe personal habits and share expectations of how we want to live safely in shared spaces.
  • In residence halls, plans will be in place to create smaller family units and limit the numbers of students in shared spaces.
  • We will communicate/document/post maximum group sizes for shared social and recreational spaces, and we will arrange furniture in those spaces to manage physical distancing.
  • We will create a community approach to ensuring surfaces and spaces remain clean.
  • Dining Services will follow best practice procedures on safely preparing the food we eat and ensuring a safely-distanced environment for the dining rooms where we will share our meals.

 

Accommodations can be requested by a student for both their academic program (in-person versus remote courses) and their on-campus residence. Accommodation requests can be made on two bases; either medical-based or general safety. Requests will be reviewed for approval.

Preference for single rooms (or alternate housing accommodations) will be given to those with medical conditions that place them at higher risk to contract COVID-19. Housing accommodations for medical priority will be made within the residence halls themselves.

Students can submit their accommodation request by completing this form, which will be reviewed by Michael Nixon, vice president for Diversity & Inclusion.

Medical-Based

Medical-based requests could be based on the following:

  • A health condition that causes immunodeficiency or a high-risk category which makes someone more susceptible to contracting COVID-19
  • Living with a family member/person who has a health condition that causes immunodeficiency which makes them more susceptible to contracting COVID-19
  • Being a caretaker for and living with a family member/person who has a health condition that causes immunodeficiency which makes them more susceptible to contracting COVID-19

Requests for medical accommodation related or unrelated to COVID-19 should also be submitted to Student Success according to established processes, which include providing medical documentation.

Safety-Based

Safety-based requests are based on an individual’s personal safety concerns that may not be medically related. These concerns should be discussed with the academic advisor or with VP Nixon to determine the best course of action.

Andrews University has canceled its fall 2020 intercollegiate athletics program which impacts men’s and women’s soccer. The United States Collegiate Athletic Association (USCAA) is considering moving the fall athletics season of 2020 to the spring of 2021. All other winter intercollegiate athletics, intramurals, gymnastic and open recreation programs will be prepared to follow and adjust to the most current health and safety recommendations currently in effect from the State of Michigan and Berrien County, as well as from athletic associations. 

ANDREWS COMMUNITY COVENANT OF CARE

In humility value others above yourselves. Philippians 2:3

As a Seventh-day Adventist Christian learning community, Andrews University is guided by the teachings and example of Jesus. We regard our personal rights and preferences as secondary to His call to care for the wellbeing of others, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This is our shared responsibility and one for which all members of the Andrews community will be held accountable.

Students, faculty and staff must take extraordinary steps to help stop the spread of COVID-19, by persistently protecting and caring for our own and others’ health and safety. Therefore, you, as a valued member of our campus community, are asked to help create a culture of care by practicing our Andrews Community Covenant of Care. A violation of this Covenant would constitute a violation of the Code of Student Conduct or the Employee Handbook and may lead to disciplinary processes.

We will continue to monitor our protocols in light of guidance from the CDC and public health officials. We also seek your understanding as this may lead to the addition of new measures or the relaxing of some requirements over time.

This Community Covenant of Care includes, but may not be limited to:

1. CARE FOR MYSELF

Conduct a daily health self-screening, taking body temperature and reporting any symptoms of COVID-19 to the technology platform database (such as a fever of 100.4 F/38 C or higher, dry cough, difficulty breathing, chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat or loss of taste or smell). We’ll also screen for potential exposure to or close contact with someone who is a confirmed/probable COVID-19 case, or for travel to or from areas that have a significant community spread of COVID-19.

Practice good hygiene by washing my hands often with soap and water, using hand sanitizer, and coughing or sneezing into the bend of my arm or a tissue.

Practice healthy habits to build my immune system (through proper diet, exercise, sleep hygiene, water intake, fresh air) and seek support and care for my mental health.

2. CARE FOR OTHERS

Respect personal space and maintain appropriate physical distancing (ideally, six feet), especially in public indoor spaces as well as occupied outdoor spaces.

Wear an appropriate face covering as the University requires.

Stay home if I feel ill or after exposure to someone who is ill or has tested positive for COVID-19.

3. CARE FOR THE ANDREWS COMMUNITY

Actively participate in cleaning and sanitizing shared common equipment and spaces.

Actively participate in testing and contact tracing to preserve the wellness of the community.

Carefully observe instructional signage and University directives.

What we do for the health and safety of our community is vitally important.

At the same time, how we do it will define who we are as a community that seeks to exemplify the love of God.

TOGETHER, AS WORLD CHANGERS FOR A CHANGING WORLD, WE WILL EXTEND GRACE, COMPASSION AND CARE TO OURSELVES, OTHERS AND THE ANDREWS COMMUNITY.

Students who violate the Community Covenant of Care will be in violation of Code #27 of the Code of Student Conduct and will be required to come into immediate compliance before participating in any specified activity. Code #27 is a “Violation of institutional policy or code published in hard copy or available electronically.” Sanctions for violations of the Community Covenant of Care range from verbal counsel to warning, or probation with various restrictions or suspension depending on the pattern or severity of behavior. 

Students will be asked to participate in maintaining a clean, disinfected environment where they live, study and play.

The University will provide basic supplies for cleaning shared spaces or frequently touched objects across campus (work spaces, classroom desks, fitness equipment, library tables, etc.) prior to each use.

Custodial staff will provide enhanced cleaning and disinfection processes, with an emphasis on community spaces and high-touch surfaces.

A staggered move-in process for the residence halls will be used and will be by appointment only (preferably beginning Monday, August 17, for new residents) to facilitate a move-in process that does not compromise current guidelines on the sizes of groups and/or numbers of people in common areas and indoor spaces.

This year, move-in day processes will begin outdoors in parking lots adjacent to the residence halls. As students move into the residence halls, they may have two additional adults with them, and they should plan to take belongings directly to their room immediately following the check-in process. Everyone assisting with move-in is required to wear a face mask at all times while in common areas, stairwells and hallways.

To mitigate transmission risks, New Student Orientation events and group meetings involving parents have been reduced. Parents or family members who assist with move-in processes will be asked to stay off-campus following move-in, and should follow safety guidelines, including wearing face coverings/masks, if they participate in Orientation events on Monday before leaving the area.

Due to these restrictions on campus guests, please note that on-campus lodging for parents will not be available.

Individuals seeking local lodging options can contact Guest & Convention Services at 269-471-3360 for assistance.

Please see the New Student Orientation schedule for further information on events.

Until the end of the fall semester, visits by guests to our campus will continue to be very limited, with no overnight guests allowed. Day visitors will be asked to conduct business interactions in remote ways. If a visit to the campus is necessary, visitors should first do a self-screening for COVID-19 symptoms and then respect all campus health and safety practices and signage while they are on campus.

Residence Hall preparations include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Most residents will have a roommate and/or suitemates, and all of those situations will be viewed as small family-like units. Residents will not be expected to wear face coverings when they are in their room with an assigned roommate or suitemates. Residents and non-resident students will be expected to physically distance and use face coverings in common spaces.
  • An increased number of single rooms will be created in Lamson and Meier Halls with a reduced single occupancy fee of an additional 25 percent.
  • Preference for single rooms (or alternate housing accommodations) will be given to those with medical conditions that place them at higher risk to contract COVID-19. The process begins by submitting this form, which will be reviewed by Michael Nixon, vice president for Diversity & Inclusion. Requests for medical accommodations related or unrelated to COVID-19 should also be submitted to Student Success according to established processes which include providing medical documentation. As far as possible, accommodations requested for medical reasons will be made within the Residence Life facilities.
  • A Welcome Kit will be provided for each room, including:
    • Cleaning guide, suggested schedule, and cleaning supplies such as a spray bottle, cleaning chemical and reusable gloves
    • Two reusable face coverings two pairs of gloves, one thermometer will be supplied for each student
  • Self-quarantine/isolation space and support services will be arranged for residence hall residents who test positive or were in close contact with someone who tested positive. Daily meals will be provided for those on a meal plan; information on how to access meal delivery services will be provided to quarantined/isolated residents without a meal plan. Appropriate academic support will be provided to all quarantined/isolated residents. Weekly laundry services will also be arranged.
  • Enhanced cleaning and disinfection protocols will be implemented by Residence Life custodial staff in common and high-touch areas. Residents will also be asked to participate in maintaining a clean environment in their own space.
  • New ionization devices have been purchased to use as an additional part of our heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in residence hall rooms where there are shared HVAC systems. This will also include community restrooms and showers in Lamson Hall East and Burman Hall and all of Lamson Hall West and Meier Hall. Damazo Hall does not have shared ventilation systems in residence hall rooms, so will not use this new device. This ionized system is designed to improve air quality and reduce the spread of infection.
  • Shared spaces and lobbies will have signage and furniture placement noting the maximum numbers of residents that meet physical distancing guidelines for that area.
  • Overnight and non-campus guests to the residence halls will not be permitted. Day visitors will be restricted to the main lobby only and must self-screen as well as respect campus health and safety practices and signage.
  • Travel and University breaks. To minimize travel exposure to COVID-19 risks, residents will be encouraged to minimize off-campus movement during fall semester. While not prohibited, overnight leaves will be discouraged. If residents conclude it is essential to take an overnight leave, they will be asked to abide by all recommended COVID-19 safety protocols (such as physical distancing, wearing a face covering, etc.) as well as be prepared to be in quarantine if they develop symptoms from exposure. It is important to note the following expectations for residence hall students related to the longer break at the end of the fall semester:
    • Depart from the residence halls by November 24 until the official end of the semester on December 10 for the holiday break and not return to campus until January 10, 2021; OR
    • Request to depart no later than December 11 and not return to campus until January 10, 2021; OR
    • Plan to remain in the designated residence hall the entire holiday break.

In response to an Executive Order released by Michigan Governor Whitmer, the Andreasen Center for Wellness will remain closed until restrictions have been lifted. Personal health and fitness activities will seek to follow the recommendations of health authorities in our new Andreasen Center for Wellness and other venues. Updates on any changes to operations will be available through the Andreasen Center for Wellness website.

Work

We will change how we work together as a campus employee community, to assure safety and protection for that community:

  • We will work with employees, allowing for remote work as needed and shift work where practical.
  • We will evaluate all of our office spaces to ensure that physical distancing is possible when people come to work, and we will discourage visitors in personal office spaces.
  • We will add additional precautions in the public spaces on our campus, such as increased cleaning and Plexiglass.
  • We will expect employees to wear face coverings in all public internal spaces as is practical and to also use face masks elsewhere where physical distancing is not possible.
  • As we do all of this, we will continue to make ourselves available to students, colleagues and the public in creative and flexible ways.

 

Employees requesting work accommodations (such as working only remotely or a combination of in-person/remote work) should first consult with their supervisor to identify options specific to their work environment and responsibilities. Accommodation requests can be made on two bases: either medical-based or general safety. Requests will be reviewed for approval.

If employees require assistance in navigating their accommodation request, they can contact the vice president for Diversity & Inclusion, Michael Nixon, through this form.

Medical-Based:

Medical-based requests could be based on the following:

  • A health condition that causes immunodeficiency or a high-risk category which makes someone more susceptible to contracting COVID-19
  • Living with a family member/person who has a health condition that causes immunodeficiency which makes them more susceptible to contracting COVID-19
  • Being a caretaker for and living with a family member/person who has a health condition that causes immunodeficiency which makes them more susceptible to contracting COVID-19

Please note that medical documentation should be submitted to the Office of Human Resources.

Safety-Based:

Safety-based requests are based on an individual’s personal safety concerns that may not be medically related. These concerns should be discussed with the supervisor first to determine the best course of action.

ANDREWS COMMUNITY COVENANT OF CARE

In humility value others above yourselves. Philippians 2:3

As a Seventh-day Adventist Christian learning community, Andrews University is guided by the teachings and example of Jesus. We regard our personal rights and preferences as secondary to His call to care for the wellbeing of others, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This is our shared responsibility and one for which all members of the Andrews community will be held accountable.

Students, faculty and staff must take extraordinary steps to help stop the spread of COVID-19, by persistently protecting and caring for our own and others’ health and safety. Therefore, you, as a valued member of our campus community, are asked to help create a culture of care by practicing our Andrews Community Covenant of Care. A violation of this Covenant would constitute a violation of the Code of Student Conduct or the Employee Handbook and may lead to disciplinary processes.

We will continue to monitor our protocols in light of guidance from the CDC and public health officials. We also seek your understanding as this may lead to the addition of new measures or the relaxing of some requirements over time.

This Community Covenant of Care includes, but may not be limited to:

1. CARE FOR MYSELF

Conduct a daily health self-screening, taking body temperature and reporting any symptoms of COVID-19 to the technology platform database (such as a fever of 100.4 F/38 C or higher, dry cough, difficulty breathing, chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat or loss of taste or smell). We’ll also screen for potential exposure to or close contact with someone who is a confirmed/probable COVID-19 case, or for travel to or from areas that have a significant community spread of COVID-19.

Practice good hygiene by washing my hands often with soap and water, using hand sanitizer and coughing or sneezing into the bend of my arm or a tissue.

Practice healthy habits to build my immune system (through proper diet, exercise, sleep hygiene, water intake, fresh air) and seek support and care for my mental health.

2. CARE FOR OTHERS

Respect personal space and maintain appropriate physical distancing (ideally, six feet), especially in public indoor spaces as well as occupied outdoor spaces.

Wear an appropriate face covering as the University requires.

Stay home if I feel ill or after exposure to someone who is ill or has tested positive for COVID-19.

3. CARE FOR THE ANDREWS COMMUNITY

Actively participate in cleaning and sanitizing shared common equipment and spaces.

Actively participate in testing and contact tracing to preserve the wellness of the community.

Carefully observe instructional signage and University directives.

What we do for the health and safety of our community is vitally important.

At the same time, how we do it will define who we are as a community that seeks to exemplify the love of God.

TOGETHER, AS WORLD CHANGERS FOR A CHANGING WORLD, WE WILL EXTEND GRACE, COMPASSION AND CARE TO OURSELVES, OTHERS AND THE ANDREWS COMMUNITY.

Due to the operations of an academic institution, all employees are considered at minimum to be of Medium risk for COVID-19 following OSHA’s Defined Exposure Risk Pyramid for COVID-19.

Additionally, individuals supervising clinical students may be considered High or Very High risk depending on the level of supervision and any required in-clinic work.

OSHA’s risk definitions include:

  • Very High: “Those with high potential for exposure to known or suspected sources of COVID-19 during specific medical, postmortem, or laboratory procedures.”
    • Examples: Healthcare/lab workers involved with COVID-19 patients
  • High: “Those with high potential for exposure to known or suspected sources of COVID-19.”
    • Examples: Healthcare support staff, medical transport, mortuary workers
  • Medium: “Those that require frequent and/or close contact with (i.e., within 6 feet of) people who may be infected with SARS-CoV-2, but who are not known or suspected COVID-19 patients. In areas without ongoing community transmission, workers in this risk group may have frequent contact with travelers who may return from international locations with widespread COVID-19 transmission. In areas where there is ongoing community transmission, workers in this category may have contact with the general public (e.g., schools, high-population-density work environments, some high-volume retail settings).”
  • Lower Risk (Caution): “Those that do not require contact with people known to be, or suspected of being, infected with SARS-CoV-2 nor frequent close contact with (i.e., within 6 feet of) the general public. Workers in this category have minimal occupational contact with the public and other coworkers.”

In the event that an employee is either isolated for being COVID-19 probable/positive (symptomatic or has tested positive), quarantined for being in close contact with a COVID-19 probable/positive individual, or directed to stay home sick through Campus Clear, that employee may begin to use their Long-term Sick Leave bank (Hourly employees) or Extended Sick Leave bank (Salaried employees) without having to use paid leave days (as would typically be required in a regular medical leave scenario) should the specific employee be unable to work either remotely or due to their illness, isolation or quarantine. Employees who are isolated or quarantined and unable to work remotely (due to job responsibilities or symptoms) would be required to apply for a Family Medical Leave through the Benefits office (benefits@andrews.edu) to access these Sick Leave banks.

Some staff and faculty will return to work on campus sooner than others. These specific employees have been or will be notified by their respective supervisors. Function-specific protocols, above and beyond those outlined for the broader campus community, may be outlined and expected of all employees returning to campus. These protocols will be communicated by supervisors in the respective offices or departments. Departments and managers are encouraged to alternate schedules and stagger shifts for those who will be asked to return to campus. These guidelines are meant to minimize personnel traffic and proximity.

If an employee is currently working remotely, they should continue to do so until additional guidance is provided by the employee’s supervisor. Staff members are likely to return to campus at different times, depending on their roles and responsibilities. Some staff members may continue to work remotely as their role allows, possibly beyond the planned reopening of campus and in-person instruction in August.

Move Around

With the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the world, our approach to travel and movement has changed. As a community, we will also take steps to ensure that our approach to travel and movement helps assure safety:

  • We are asking our employees and students not to travel internationally during the fall semester of 2020.
  • We are asking our employees and students not to travel within the United States to large events during fall semester and to minimize travel in the U.S. to smaller venues/events.
  • We are asking that the campus community as a whole be cautious as they travel locally and ask that they follow the expected guidelines in the State of Michigan or in nearby states.
  • To help minimize travel, the schedule for the semester will be adjusted to remove the Labor Day holiday and fall semester break and instead end in-person classes on November 24.

 

The following subsections outline the University's planned response to help keep the campus safe through the end of the 2020 fall semester as it relates to travel, events and visitors to the campus.

This is subject to change and is based on our current understanding of the likely environment in which the campus will operate from August 1 onward. However, until changes are approved by the University, we will ask for consistent support of these actions from all of our campus community. If at any time our approved actions do not align with state or federal regulations, then the most conservative of those positions will be taken.

Local Personal Travel Within the Michiana Area

For individuals traveling within the local community, they are expected to maintain physical distancing and wear face coverings when others are present. Physical distancing expectations (6 feet or more) should reduce carpooling with others outside of households, especially over distances that require 15 minutes or more of travel. 

Off-Campus Personal Travel Outside of the Local Michiana Area

To help reduce the spread of COVID-19, the University does expect both employees and students to limit their travel during the semester to essential travel only. When traveling, everyone is expected to follow mitigation measures required by the travel destination or the University, whichever is more conservative, including physical distancing (6ft or more) and the wearing of face coverings.

In the event that you are unable to physically distance (less than 6ft, for 15 minutes or more) during your essential travel, either due to transportation method (plane or other public transportation) or attendance to an event, the University will expect you to complete the following:

  • That employees notify their University supervisor of their travel (applies to all on-campus employees, including student workers)
  • That students notify their teachers and Student Life dean (applies to all on-campus students)
  • That you arrange to be tested for COVID-19 no sooner than four days* after your return to campus or at the first sign of COVID-19 symptoms.*the minimum period for incubation before a test is considered valid
  • That you submit your test results to covid19@andrews.edu
  • That you will take additional precautions as you navigate campus until you receive negative test results which include:
    • Not attending campus wide events
    • Only accessing Dining Services for take out (no dine-in)
    • Coordinate potential for remote work or classroom options with supervisor/faculty
  • That you continue to follow normal mitigation procedures for physical distancing (6ft or more), face coverings, and hygiene both on and off campus.

Upon notification of travel, supervisors and Student Life deans should request the employee or student to take any necessary additional precautions to limit the risk of transmission to others until their test results are provided.

The work-related travel expectations of employees will be based on the specific objectives of the travel and should also be based on the mitigation steps (face coverings, physical distancing, etc.) used at the travel destination. Travel may result in a required controlled reentry to campus (such as a 14-day quarantine) coordinated with the employee’s supervisor.

  • Cohort Sites: All international cohort teaching should remain remote; U.S.-based cohorts are also encouraged to remain remote. Teachers (at their discretion) who travel may require a controlled reentry, as described above.
  • Attendance at conferences should be avoided when they involve a large scale event where individuals are coming from around the country/world with multiple points of connection.
  • Additional personal travel following an off-campus University event will be at the individual’s discretion in consultation with the supervisor. Mitigation measures (face coverings, physical distance) are encouraged, and a controlled reentry may be required.
  • Site-specific U.S.-based events should remain remote where possible. International events should be avoided. Attendance at these off-campus events may require a controlled reentry.
    • Site-specific events include events normally occurring in one defined place (eg. church service for a local church, accreditation team visits, recruitment events, graduation speaking appointments, etc.).
  • Small off-campus gatherings will be at the individual employee’s discretion in consultation with the supervisor and should occur only when essential, where remote is typically preferred. Mitigation measures (face coverings, physical distance) should be followed, and a controlled reentry may be required.
    • Gatherings will follow Michigan’s definitions and should also follow the applicable specific state’s guidelines or Michigan’s, whichever is the most conservative for the defined event/program.
  • University-sponsored retreats/events involving off-campus locations and/or gatherings that include either a mix of students/employees or employees from multiple offices or departments should be avoided. Events that do occur must follow University event requirements and mitigation measures or the applicable state’s guidelines, whichever is the most conservative for the defined event/program. Overnight off-campus events are not permitted (Note: University academic tours are regulated separately and have different guidelines from retreats).

Student travel expectations will be based on the type of event and location.

The following travel events by students should be avoided:

  • University-sponsored group tours/conferences
  • University-sponsored individual travel to a group event where individuals are coming from multiple places
  • Travel to areas where there is significant COVID-19 community spread
  • Note: Consideration should be given to travel methods and the duration of travel as it relates to transmission risks

University-sponsored travel to a controlled environment on an individual basis will be allowed, especially in the case of student practicums and/or internships.

Personal travel during academic breaks has been reduced by adjustments to the academic schedule, including removal of certain semester holidays and breaks. During the academic schedule, students should minimize their travel and follow the appropriate mitigation steps (face coverings, physical distancing, etc.) used at the destination or as recommended by the state of Michigan, whichever is more conservative.

Expectations for events on campus will be based on the size/nature of the event and the extent of travel required for event attendees and participants. Please note that University guest rooms will not be available.

The following events should be avoided:

  • Group events with individuals arriving from around the country, with multiple points of connection
  • Non-Howard Center events involving invited groups/artists/speakers

Howard Performing Arts Center events with community attendance should follow government guidelines on size and control.

On-campus events for students/employees should be smaller in nature, follow mitigation measures, and follow state guidelines. Inviting speakers to campus is discouraged, especially when those speakers travel from out of the area. The inviting department/office should ensure that the invited speaker follows University mitigation steps and should seek to reduce transmission risk by modifying the speaker’s interaction with event attendees primarily by physical distance or, where maintaining distance is less feasible, by limiting time of interaction. Remote options are expected to be used with speakers whenever possible. 

To help reduce transmission risks, campus visitors should be limited. Departments should ensure that remote options are readily available and communicated to visitors to provide a similar level of service to those guests when their access to campus is limited. Specific expectations will be based on the purpose of the visit:

  • Visitors coming for special events/personal visits are discouraged, especially when traveling from out of the area.
  • Uninvited guests/drop-ins are discouraged, and remote services should be provided and promoted.
  • Invited vendors/consultants should work remotely where possible and, where not, should only be invited for essential work. Offices or departments receiving those individuals to campus should ensure mitigation protocols are followed.

Facility Use

The use of campus facilities, both buildings and campus grounds, has been altered to promote safe interactions that foster a learning environment while mitigating COVID-19 risks.

  • We will wear face coverings where appropriate.
  • We will adjust the size of events or use of space to promote physical distancing.
  • We will adjust our use of spaces to adjust for increased Custodial work.
  • We may limit access to spaces to reduce transmission risks.

 

To help reduce transmission risks, campus facilities may alter their access or services when needed. These modifications are listed under their specific sections below.

  • Adjusting the building schedule to follow the schedule of each building’s services (which may include closing the building earlier)
  • Reducing campus building access to the general public
  • Limiting the number of entrances
  • Closure of specific areas or spaces where physical distancing would not be effective
  • Reducing the use of academic spaces for non-academic purposes
  • Modification of facility rental policies to include:
    • Reducing or removing the availability to rent specific spaces for non-academic purposes
    • Reducing the event capacity to promote physical distancing
    • Increase in rental fees to accommodate extra cleaning requirements
  • Identify frequently used doors (i.e. in academic department suites) that are not fire-rated and which can be propped open to reduce high-touch areas.
    • Fire-rated doors should not be propped unless connected to the building’s fire alarm system.
    • Note: Fire-rated doors are typically found on main corridors, stairwells, residential rooms, and/or rooms with higher risk of fire, such as electrical or mechanical rooms.
  • Reduce or remove hard-copy materials (brochures/pamphlets/magazines or hymnals/Bibles from chapels).
    • Where unable to remove hard-copy materials, please note that single use materials (such as brochures/pamphlets) should not be returned.

To promote appropriate physical distancing, the occupant loads of campus spaces will be temporarily reduced. This will involve the posting of occupant load signs and the adjustment of room features (either closure or adjustment of furniture). Furniture from spaces that have been closed or not made available must remain adjusted until the temporary occupant load is lifted.

Classrooms

The following criteria will be used to identify the reduced occupant loads for academic or co-curricular events.

  • Classroom student seating will predominantly be based on a 50 percent reduction in occupancy.
  • Depending on the classroom layout or function (lab-based, etc.) the occupant load may be adjusted.

Elevators

Elevators will be limited to one passenger at a time. Variance in numbers allowed on elevators  will be given for care aides or additional members of the same household. Priority should be given to those with accessibility needs and their care aides.

Events

The occupant load for an event will be based on both the location and type of event and may be adjusted to meet applicable local or state guidelines. Occupant loads should also reflect physical distance requirements.

Please note that the University’s expectations of occupant loads or physical distancing may not reflect the federal/state guidelines specific to contact tracing. Specifically, the federal/state definition of “Close Contacts” may require an individual to be quarantined by the local health department if they have been in proximity to a COVID-19 test-positive individual for:

  • 15 minutes or more AND
  • under six feet/two meters of physical distance.

Classroom Type (outside of regular course schedule):

  • Criteria: Located in a classroom and with a lecture-based setting, where attendees remain seated, facing the same direction, and are primarily listening to a presenter/lecturer. A typical classroom type example is the University’s co-curricular programs.
  • Occupant Load:
    • 50 percent occupancy or a max of 100, whichever is smaller.
    • Event seating should be staggered to alternate every other chair.

Religious Type:

  • Criteria: Located in a large event space (seating capacity over 400*) where attendees remain seated, facing the same direction, and are primarily listening to a presenter/speaker. A typical religious type example is a vespers or church event held in the Howard Performing Arts Center or the Pioneer Memorial Church.

*For spaces with seating capacity under 400, use Classroom Type described above.

  • Occupant Load:
    • Indoor: Either 25 percent occupancy or max of 250, whichever is smaller.
    • Outdoor: Either 25 percent occupancy or max of 500, whichever is smaller.
    • Event seating should be staggered to alternate chairs and establish physical distancing.

Social Type:

  • Criteria: Events located indoors that are not academic, part of the co-curricular programming, or religious in nature. Events can include: University-sponsored social recreation activities, personal/private events.
  • Occupant Load: Will be Phase-specific per State of Michigan guidelines.

Outdoor Type:

  • Criteria: Located in an outdoor event without restricted air movement.*
  • Occupant Load: Will be Phase-specific** per State of Michigan guidelines.

*Restricted air movement can include physical barriers such as walls (regardless of construction type) but does not include any overhead barriers. For example, a tent without side curtains/walls attached would be considered an Outdoor Type.

Events not falling under these categories will follow the State’s general guidelines applicable to the corresponding Phase at the time of the event.

**Based on recent MI Executive Orders, this could include:

  • Phases 1–3—Small gatherings prohibited
  • Phase 4—Small gatherings limited to:
    • Indoor: 10 individuals
    • Outdoor:  100 individuals
  • Phase 5—Small gatherings limited to:
    • Indoor: 50 individuals
    • Outdoor: 250 individuals

Lobby/Lounge

Maximum occupancy for lobbies and lounges will be posted. The following criteria will be used to generally identify the reduced occupant loads:

  • Physical distance of six feet/two meters OR
  • Occupant load factor of 113 feet square per person (load calculated by dividing total square footage by load factor)
  • Note: Priority in occupancy is deferred to seating (versus. standing room)
  • Note: Occupant loads may need to be reduced for spaces with limited air circulation

Study Rooms

The following criteria will be used to identify the reduced occupant loads.

  • Physical distance of six feet/two meters OR
  • Occupant load factor of 113 feet square per person (load calculated by dividing total square footage by load factor)
  • Note: Priority in occupancy deferred to seating (versus standing room)
  • Note: Occupant loads may need to be reduced for spaces with limited air circulation
  • Note: For major/program-specific study rooms, building managers are encouraged to consider scheduling study room use to:
    • Ensure that students have equal access to the space under the reduced occupancy
    • Rooms cannot be scheduled if the planned use doesn’t allow for physical distancing requirements (6 ft/2m), or if those in the room face each other.

To help keep the campus informed and reminded of expectations, signage has been placed throughout the campus to provide details on expectations, occupant loads and other mitigation measures. The campus is expected to adhere to all posted signage. 

Some COVID-19 mitigation measures will be specific to the type of space, regardless of who is using the space. These measures are identified below by specific space type.

Breakroom/Kitchenettes

  • Remove/restrict access to reusable kitchen utensils.
  • Recommend use of only disposable kitchen utensils.
  • Identify and post cleaning frequency for high-contact surfaces, especially kitchen control items (such as microwave, sink, etc.).
  • Consider restricting or reducing access to ensure that cleaning frequencies match the expected use.

Conference Rooms

  • Avoid use of conference rooms for in-person meetings and promote/use remote alternatives.

Front Desks

  • Assess spaces for installation of physical barriers/sneeze guard.
  • Remove public food distribution points (candy/snack dish).

Lobbies & Lounges

  • Departments should coordinate with the dean to identify spaces, and those that are essential to remain open should follow proper mitigation steps:
    • Increased cleaning frequency
    • Adjusted/reduced furniture to create physical distance
    • Posted occupant load
    • Installation of sneeze guards
  • Close non-essential spaces or those that cannot have risks mitigated.

Restrooms

  • Review possibility of installing foot/arm pull devices to reduce hand contact on door handle/knob.
  • Review high-traffic restrooms and possibility of increasing contactless controls (toilet/sink/soap dispenser/hand drying method/light switch).
  • Use a towel dispenser instead of air dryers.
  • Where barriers are not available, close access to create physical distancing (sinks and urinals).

Study Spaces

For areas specifically designated for study, other than classrooms:

  • Departments should coordinate with the dean on space management regarding COVID-19 risks and possible mitigation steps:
    • Identification of study spaces
    • Determination on whether space can be safely kept open
    • Physical distancing
      • Post reduced occupant load
      • Adjust/reduce furniture to create physical distance
      • Schedule use per student(s) to reduce occupant load
    • Installation of sneeze guards
    • Identify and post cleaning frequency/schedule
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Preparing for Life at Andrews This Fall

As we prepare to gather once again in community—to live, study, play and pray together this fall semester—we are reminded of the awesome responsibility as followers of Jesus to care for the wellbeing of others. As a result, we will commit to take steps to minimize the risk of COVID-19 infection at Andrews University as we return to in-person studies. It is an important and shared responsibility. Every member of the community, including you, must do their part.

We will continue to be careful in every step we take. As we monitor the health of individuals and our University community, we will also monitor and adjust our protocols in light of guidance from the CDC, infectious disease specialists and Berrien County health officials.

We seek your patience, commitment and understanding as we move forward in our commitment to the values of Community, Safety and Inclusivity. We once again seek to be a community that remains committed to these goals and to inspiring each one of us—now more than ever—to be World Changers for a changing world.