English and Languages

what to say and how to say it

Because the ability to write clear English prose is the mark of the educated person, Andrews Academy requires that its students receive sufficient practice toward this end. The ability to write well is, in fact, the sine qua non of the educated person. The four years in high school are the time students should use to hone their writing skills, and the writing courses offered at Andrews Academy provide the opportunity for the student to become a practiced writer. Students and parents should note that the students must put forth honest effort and be willing to write and rewrite their assignments before handing them in. Students and parents should also note that the work meriting an "A" is work that is submitted on time. Handing in work that is days or even weeks late is not the mark of excellence in a student.

*English I (0.5 units/semester)
Freshman English focuses on a study of selected works from young adult literature, as well as poetry, drama, and fiction from American and British literature. Writing is an essential component of the course. Instruction in standard English grammar also constitutes part of the subject matter. English I credit. First and second semesters.

*Beginning English Composition and Literature (0.5 units/semester)
This course is designed to assist international students in learning the fundamental elements of literature and writing to prepare them for academy level English courses. It is highly recommended as the beginning course for international ESL students during their first year in the United States.

*English II (0.5 units/semester)
Sophomore English builds on the writing skills practiced in the freshman year and examines a selection of poetry, fiction, and essays from American and British literature. The course will also introduce the student to a discussion and critical analysis of television programming. The emphasis on writing initiated in the freshman year will continue during the sophomore year. Instruction in standard English grammar will build on the knowledge gained during the freshman year. English II credit. Prerequisite: English I.

*Freshmen and sophomores must enroll in these courses.

Contemporary British Literature (0.5 units)
This course emphasizes literary evaluation of a narrative work and three or four contemporary poems and or songs chosen from British writers. The course includes interpretive reading, discussion, and oral/written evaluations based on standards for artistic and moral excellence. Literature credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. Second semester, odd years.

Poetry (0.5 units)
The study and analysis of various forms of verse and poetry. Emphasis is given to interpretive reading, written analysis, and creative writing of poetry. Prerequisite: English I and II. Second semester, odd years.

Children’s Literature (0.5 units)
This course involves "doing" literature. Students read classics of children’s literature. They practice reading a work from children’s literature interpretively, write a work of children’s literature of their own with illustrations, and write at least one analytical report of a classic work of children’s literature. Prerequisite: English I and II. First semester.

American Classics I (0.5 units)
Emphasis will be on selections of poetry and narrative literature from Colonial times through the Civil War. Written analyses and oral interpretations are required. Literature credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. First semester, even years.

American Classics II (0.5 units)
Literary works chosen for study in this course come from such authors as Mark Twain, Edwin Arlington Robinson, Stephen Crane, Frank Norris and Willa Cather. The literature read may vary each time the course is offered, but they will be of equal rigor and depth. Written work and oral interpretation also constitute an integral part of the course. Literature credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. Second semester, even years.

British Classics I (0.5 units)
A course designed to immerse students in the study of British literature written in the periods between the end of the Roman occupation and the beginning of the Renaissance. Students will examine and discuss examples of literary genres common to this time period including Epic and Alliterative poetry, Morality Plays/Allegory, and quest narrative, as well as the history and formation of the English language during this time period. Prerequisite: English I and II. First semester, odd years.

British Classics I: Shakespeare (0.5 units)
Studying three genres – comedy, tragedy, and history – British Literature: Shakespeare explores history's most prolific playwright, his stage, theater, and historical context, concentrating on A Midsummer Night's Dream, Richard III, and Macbeth. The course emphasizes critical reading, textual analysis, and expository writing. Prerequisite: English I and II. First semester, odd years.

British Classics II (0.5 units)
An intensive study of George Orwell's Animal Farm, Alan Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country, and George Bernard Shaw's Saint Joan. Written work and oral interpretation constitute part of the course. Literature credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. Second semester, odd years.

Arts, Architecture and Ideas, 1400-1750 (0.5 units)

American Ethnic Literature (0.5 units)
A study of selected works from African American, Native American, and Chicano authors. Emphasis is also placed on expository writing related to the material studied. Works examined may vary each time the course is offered. The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to topics, themes, and points of view which may differ from those commonly accepted in his/her family and social group. Prerequisite: English I and II. Second semester, even years.

American Literature Tour (0.5 units)
A directed study/travel course offered in conjunction with the History Department. Sites of literary and historical importance will be visited during the week-long tour. Students will read works relevant to the sites to be visited. Each student will research an author and one significant work (more if short works are involved) and make a five-minute summary presentation. Three 1,200-word essays will be an essential part of the class. Second semester.

Speech: Introduction to Public Speaking (0.5 units)
Emphasis is on the basics of formal speech including the following types: introductory, information, demonstration, persuasion and the report. One appearance before an audience is required. Speech credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. First semester, even years.

Speech: Communication Skills/Dramatic Interpretation (0.5 units)
A study of communication within groups and one-on-one communication including social conversation, telephoning, the interview, and parliamentary procedure. One appearance before an audience is required. Speech credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. First semester, odd years.

Literary Interpretation (0.5 units)
Presentation of a dramatic work before an audience. Each student will have a role in the play or a supporting responsibility, such as light and sound operator, wardrobe manager, play bill and publicity director, or set carpenter. The work presented will vary each time the course is offered. The course requires attendance at the class period during the school day and regular attendance at evening rehearsals. First semester, even years.

Conflict and Accord (0.5 units)
An interdisciplinary approach to race relations and social interaction, Conflict and Accord explores the history of Buxton, Iowa, and the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921. The course emphasizes critical reading, research and composition skills, requiring essays, sustained writing assignments, and culminates in a research project. Open to Juniors/Seniors, the course may be taken for either English or history credit.

Castle & Commons (0.5 units)
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of medieval life, Castle and Commons studies the life and culture of 15th century England, focusing on social systems, economics, succession, and day-to-day living. The course emphasizes critical reading, reading and composition skills, requiring essays, paper-length writing assignments, and culminates in a research project. Open to Juniors/Seniors, the course may be taken for either English or history credit.

British Literature Tour (0.5 units)
A course designed to give students the opportunity to study British literature both in the classroom and on location. Students will spend 10 days in England visiting sites associated with British literature, history, and culture and a number of British authors. In addition to site visitation during the tour, time will be reserved for class discussion, tests, reading, and written assignments.

Old Testament Classics (0.5 units)
Old Testament Classics examines the literary artistry of such selections as Genesis 1:11, the Joseph narrative, the story of David, the books of Amos, and Job. The purpose of the course is to discover how the central theme in each work develops from the literary structure. Written analyses and oral presentations are required. Literature or religion credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. Second semester, odd years.

New Testament Classics (0.5 units)
New Testament Classics draws its content from contrasting styles of Mark, John, and the Apocalypse. The idea that an author wrote the material and presented it in his own special way is central to the course. An examination of how the author presents his information leads to a study of what the author is trying to say. Written analyses and oral interpretations are a significant part of the course. Literature or religion credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. Second semester, even years.

Beginning Newswriting (0.5 units)
This course introduces the student to a basic process for writing the news including interviews, straight news, features, headlines, and picture captions. Students will observe examples of the above in school and commercial newspapers, and will write, evaluate, edit, and study newspaper layout. Elective English credit. (Not available as composition credit) First and second semesters.

Research Composition (0.5 units)
This course informs the students about proper annotation, note-taking, and bibliographic methods for writing a research or term paper, focusing on an appropriately narrowed topic. The subjects of research vary from time to time, but the class usually studies a particular area for research, and the students then select a narrowed topic relating to that area. The course fulfills the requirement for credit in writing and the more rigorous requirement for Graduation with Academic Honors or with the Comprehensive Endorsement. Composition credit. Prerequisite: English II with a minimum average grade of B or submission of a sample essay approved by the teacher. Second semester.

Expository Composition (0.5 units)
Expository writing focuses on the media and requires three essays of 1500 words on the hidden persuaders of magazine or television advertising, a six-page book review, and practice in writing precis or abstracts on current issues reported in magazines. The course will teach the students how to craft an introduction to an essay, how to develop paragraphs that begin with a focusing topic sentence, how to stay on the subject stated in the topic sentence, and how to develop coherence in the essay. The degree to which the student develops proficiency in the skills mentioned above determine his/her grade in the course. Another significant factor in determining grade is turning the assignments in on schedule. Composition credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. Second semester.

The Art of Autobiography (0.5 units)
The student will read and discuss two autobiographies and use the stories as models for writing autobiographical incidents from their lives and biographical anecdotes about members of their extended families. Everyone has a story to tell, and the course draws its material from that fact. In addition, the course teaches various sentence structures particularly suited to narrative writing. Students will write three autobiographical or biographical essays over the semester, as well as two or three shorter pieces. This course requires discussion, interpretative reading, and written analyses. This course may be offered in place of British or American Classics in the first semester. Literature or composition credit. Prerequisite: English I and II.

Newswriting I & II (0.5 units/semester)
Newswriting introduces students to and requires practice in the various forms of journalistic writing. Student will examine models of the straight news story, editorials, feature articles, the sports story, and the human interest story. In addition, students will evaluate and edit articles considered for publication in the school newspaper, the Sanjo. In order to achieve a grade of “A,” students must have an article published in the school paper. In other words, the work must be of sufficient quality to be presented to a wider audience than merely the class members. Composition credit. Prerequisite: English I and II. First and second semesters.

The Literary Essay (0.5 units)
This course focuses on the structure and meaning of the literary essay. Student will read, discuss, and write analyses of essays. They will write précis and abstracts of essays and craft essays of their own.

AP Language and Composition (0.5 units/semester)
A course intended to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement test in Language and Composition given annually during the second week in May. Readings and assignments are what the student can expect at any college known for rigor. Readings deal with contemporary issues, such as education, politics, racial relations, constitutional liberties, sports, and historical events. Numerous writing assignments are required. No student is required to take the AP exam, but the student would be well advised to take the test. Research shows that even those who do not pass the test do better in college-level courses than others who have never taken the course. Note that the grades received in the course are separate from the grade received on the AP exam. Composition credit. Permission of the instructor. First and second semesters.

Sanjo (0.5 units/semester)
This course is a year-long course involving production of the Andrews Academy school newspaper the Sanjo. Student will be involved with writing, editing, and layout. Prerequisite: English I and II, Newswriting and permission of the instructor. First and second semesters.

German I (0.5 units/semester)
Introduction to the basic grammatical structures of German through the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Stresses historical and cultural aspects of German life. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. First and second semesters.

German II (0.5 units/semester)
Continued emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing the German language. Focuses on some of the more complex grammatical structures. Examines the culture of contemporary Germany. Prerequisite: German I with a minimum grade of C. First and second semesters.

German Cultural History (0.2 units)
A summer travel/study tour focusing on German culture, history, and language. The course examines the history of the German speaking world as reflected in art and architecture from 1200 to 1800 and requires identification of Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque art. A tour project is submitted upon return. Summer. Even years.

Spanish I (0.5 units/semester)
An introduction to the Spanish language and culture. It provides the necessary skills to begin communicating in the language. Equal emphasis is placed on the fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The geography, history and cultural life of Spain, Latin America, and Hispanic-America are carefully incorporated into the lessons. Active participation in class is essential for student success. First and second semesters.

Spanish II (0.5 units/semester)
A review and enhancement of the major grammatical structures in order to increase student's listening and speaking ability, and to expand reading and writing skills. New vocabulary will be introduced and practiced. Further study of the Spanish-speaking world is done through a balanced blend of cultural presentations including music, selected literary passages and art. Active participation in class is essential for student success. Prerequisite: Spanish I with a minimum grade of C. Students wishing to pursue advanced Spanish studies are encouraged to enroll in the applicable Spanish courses offered in the International Language Studies Department at Andrews University.

Spain's Cultural History (0.2 units)
The Spain Educational Tour is a directed study, three-week long, summer travel/study course. Class members meet various times during second semester for preliminary studies and preparation for the touring weeks. The actual tour provides an opportunity for the student to experience the geography and rich history of Spain as reflected in its art, music, architecture, and contemporary daily life. While en route, students take notes and maintain a daily journal. A final pictorial and written tour project is submitted for credit upon return. Even years.

NOTE: Foreign language is taught as a second language and is not appropriate for those for whom it is their mother tongue.