Course Descriptions

CHURCH

HIST316 (3)
History of the Christian Church I
Surveys the internal and external developments and conflicts which Christianity has experienced from the time of Christ up to the Reformation. Special attention given to those developments that relate to Seventh-day Adventist theological heritage. Prerequisite: HIST117 or permission of instructor. Fall

HIST316 V (3)
History of the Christian Church I
AU/HSI course-see content above.

HIST317 (3)
History of the Christian Church II
Surveys the history of the church from the Protestant Reformation to current time. Special attention is given to the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic counter-reformation, Puritanism, Rationalism, Evangelicalism, the rise of modern denominations, the world-wide mission expansion and ecumenism. Prerequisite: HIST118 or permission of instructor. Spring

HIST317 V (3)
History of the Christian Church II
AU/HSI course-see content above.

HIST404 (3)
Adventist Heritage
A study of the background and development of the Seventh-day Adventist denomination from its beginnings in the Millerite Movement to its present global impact. Spring

HIST404 V (3)
Adventist Heritage
AU/HSI course-see content above. Available in standard and EEC formats (see p. 43). All CHIS courses are described under Church History in the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary section of the bulletin.


EUROPE

HIST117 (3)
Civilizations and Ideas I
Survey of the development of major world civilizations, with emphasis on the West, and their contributions to the history of ideas to the 16th century. Fall

HIST117 V (3)
Civilizations and Ideas I
AU/HSI course-see content above. Available in standard and EEC formats (see p. 43).

HIST118 (3)
Civilizations and Ideas IISurvey of the development of major world civilizations, with emphasis on the West, and their contributions to the history of ideas from the 16th century to the present. Spring

HIST118 V (3)
Civilizations and Ideas II
AU/HSI course-see content above. Available in standard and EEC formats (see p. 43).

HIST414 Alt (3)
Renaissance and Reformation, 1300-1648
The birth of the modern age, with emphasis on the religious, artistic, literary, and philosophic aspects of the Renaissance and the religious, political, social, and intellectual aspects of the Protestant Reformation. Special emphasis is given to church-state relations and the struggle for religious toleration from 1517 to 1650. Fall

HIST415 Alt (3)
Absolutism and Enlightenment, 1648-1789
The rise of absolute monarchies and their impact on political, social, economic, and intellectual developments of early modern Europe. Special emphasis is given to church-state relations and the struggle for religious liberty from 1650-1789. Fall

HIST420 Alt (3)
Revolutions and Reaction, 1789-1917
The religious and social transformation of Europe during the French Revolution, the Napoleonic era, the political revolutions of the nineteenth century, the industrial revolution, the First World War, and the Russian Revolution. Special attention is given to such ideologies as nationalism, anti-Semitism, and Marxism. Fall

HIST425 Alt (3)
Nationalism and World Wars, 1914-Present
A study of European society, including the role of the Christian church, during the two world wars and the Cold War as influenced by Nazism, Stalinism, Western democracy, and the emerging "new world order." Spring

HIST450 Alt (3)
The Holocaust and Society
An inquiry into anti-Semitism and Nazism with special attention to the Holocaust and the role of the Christian Church. Spring


UNITED STATES

HIST204 (3)
American Experience I
A study of the rise and development of the United States from European contact with the Americas through the Civil War. Emphasis placed on cultural, religious, ethnic, and other social issues as well as politics, economics, and foreign relations. Fall

HIST204 V (3)
American Experience I 
AU/HSI course-see content above.

HIST205 (3)
American Experience II
A study of the development of the United States from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis placed on cultural, religious, ethnic, and other social issues as well as politics, economics, and foreign relations. Spring

HIST205 V (3)
American Experience II
AU/HSI course-see content above.

HIST320 Alt (3)
Economic History of the United States
A survey of the United States' growth and transformation into an industrialized nation. Economic analysis is used to explain the sources and consequences of the U.S. economic change. Topics covered include the rise of the corporation, the emergence of a national market, financial development, slavery, government regulation, transportation, the Great Depression, and rapid post-World War II growth.
 

HIST434 Alt (3)
From Discovery to Nation, 1492-1789
A study of the political, economic, and social development of America from discovery to 1789, with an emphasis on church-state relations and the struggle for religious liberty from 1607 to the American Revolution and the establishment of the Constitution. Spring

HIST435 Alt (3)
Union and Disunion, 1789-1865
Examines major events and developments through the lenses of religion, race, gender, class and culture. Emphasis is given to disestablishment of the churches, concepts of democracy, slavery, westward expansion, and the Civil War. Fall

HIST437 (3)
Topics:
A study of selected topics in history as announced in the class schedule. May be repeated with different topics.
 

HIST458 Alt (3)
The Emergence of Modern America, 1865-1939
Examines major events and developments through the lenses of religion, race, gender, and class and their impact on the individual's place in American society. Topics include religious pluralism and its social implications, Reconstruction, the Industrial Revolution, social and political reform, expansionism, World War I, and the Great Depression. Fall

HIST468 Alt (3)
Multi-cultural America
An examination of the historical experience of ethnic minority groups in the United States, including their development as subcultures and interactions with the dominant society. Groups studied include African, Chinese, Hispanic, Japanese, Arab, and Native Americans. Spring

HIST469 Alt (3)
America as a World Power, 1939-Present
An examination of issues of national consciousness and cultural identity within major topics of the period such as World War II, the Cold War, Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement, Watergate, relationship of church and state, and various contemporary issues. Spring


RESEARCH AND SPECIALIZED COURSES

HIST235 Alt (3)
Historical Inquiry
An introduction to history as an academic discipline. Students will learn the basic elements of historical discourse (essays, book reviews, articles, and monographs), the process of analyzing primary sources, and the fundamental tools and procedures of research. A brief survey of the history of historical writing and significant historical theories will also be included.

HIST437 (3)
Topics:
A study of selected topics in history as announced in the class schedule.  May be repeated with different topics.

HIST459 (3)
Special Methods in Teaching History and Social Studies
A practicum taken prior to student teaching. Emphasizes methods, materials, and techniques of teaching history, geography, and social studies in grades 7-12. Required of students seeking secondary certification in history or social studies. Does not apply to a minor in history. Prerequisite: EDTE459. Fall

HIST480 (3)
Senior Seminar
A capstone course for the history major normally taken during the senior year, including the reading of classic works of history, the presentation of a portfolio of the student's writing, and a departmental oral examination. Spring

HIST488 S (3)
Faith and History
A study of the major philosophies of history and contemporary theoretical issues in the discipline with emphasis upon implications for a Christian understanding of history. Fall

HIST490 (3)
Research Seminar
Introduction to historical research methodology, including both bibliographical searches and critical evaluation of sources. Requires the writing of a research paper using primary sources. Prerequisite: Open to seniors only or with permission of instructor. Fall

HIST495 (1-3)
Independent Study/Readings/Research
Individually directed study, readings, or research in selected areas of history under the guidance of the appropriate instructor. Repeatable in a different area for up to 3 credits. Limited to majors and minors in history and social studies. Registration by permission of instructor. Fall, Spring

HIST590 (1-2)
Independent Readings
Individual reading in a specified area under the guidance of an instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits. Fall, Spring


POLITICAL SCIENCE

PLSC104 (3)
American Government
A study of American political institutions and behavior, primarily on the national level, and their global relationships. May be applied to the history major. Fall, Spring

PLSC104 V (3)
American Government
AU/HSI course-see content above.

PLSC120 Alt (3)
Analyzing Politics
An introduction to political science, including its historical development, the basic elements of political discourse, and the fundamental tools for thinking analytically, such as formulating theories, conducting inquiries, and gathering and evaluating information. Fall
 

PLSC260 Alt (3)
Introduction to American Law
A study of the roles that law and the legal system play in American life. Topics include: the constitution, civil rights, property, employment, consumer protections, criminal punishment and judicial activism/restraint. Spring

PLSC225 Alt (3)
Comparative Politics
Examines the global phenomenons of rule such as theocracies, democracies, monarchies, authoritarianism, totalitarianism, and repressive-development regimes; imperialism, colonialism, and communism. Analyzes the historical emergence of these forms of rule, their nature and form, the dynamics of particular types of governance, and the forces resisting such rule. Spring

PLSC230 Alt (3)

International Relations
A systematic analysis of select nation-states in the modern era, with particular consideration given to the geographic, cultural, religious, social, and economic factors that contribute to shaping each nation's politics. Spring

PLSC237 (3)
The Individual, State, and Marketplace
Introduces students to the processes by which public policies are made and the implications of those processes and policies for individuals, addressing such issues as the role of national government in a global economic environment and the implications of this environment for the efficiency and equity of economic systems.  Not applicable to the political science major or minor.  Applies to the General Education Social Science requirements.

PLSC316 Alt (3)
Legal Writing and Rhetoric
An introduction to academic and professional writing, particularly argument and analysis, as they relate to the law, including theoretical and practical applications. Assignment will include pleadings, briefs, and memoranda. Students will also develop a philosophical and rhetorical understanding of their function as writers in relation to the law and the legal system. Spring

PLSC350 Alt (3)
Government Affairs
Presents various leadership theories and approaches as applied to administration of the public sector. Requires the student's development of his/her own management perspective as applied to case studies from governments internationally. Spring

PLSC360 (3)
Area Study:
Study of the government and politics of individual nations (for example, India) or geographical regions (for example, Asia), as announced in the course schedule. Examines process, forces, and trends in the nation's/region's politics as it addresses societal needs and economic development. May be repeated with a different emphasis. May be applied to the history major. Fall

PLSC365  Alt (3)
American Foreign Relations
A study of the formation and conduct of American diplomacy in the light of major themes, including the diplomacy of human rights, globalization, and the American relationship with Islamic states.

PLSC370 Alt (3)
Political Thought, Culture and Change
A study of the great political ideas from antiquity to modern times including such theorists as Plato, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Marx, Mills, and Rawls. Examines the philosophical and political bases espoused by each writer as they relate to justice, class struggle, natural rights, ownership, purpose of politics, and ideal forms of government. May be applied to the history major. Fall

HIST/PLSC378 (3-6)
Study Tour:
Travel to selected areas of historical and/or political interest combined with lectures, directed reading, and individual research. The amount of credit and the geographic area are designated at the time a study tour is announced. A maximum of six credits may be applied to the history or political science major.

PLSC420 G Alt (3)
Human Rights, Violations, and Reconciliations
An interdisciplinary approach to concepts of human rights within western and non-western traditions. The course will evaluate legal and political instruments that address human rights and examine the meaning and relevance of these rights to such contemporary issues as torture, political repression, war crimes, genocide, and refugees. Spring

PLSC425 Alt (3)
Crafting Constitutions and Public Policy
An investigation of activities essential to national and state constitution formulation and the creation of public policies, economic, cultural, social, and political elements that impact the process; high level responses to policies such as the non-violent resistance of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. Spring

PLSC430 Alt (3)
Contemporary Political Issues
Introduces students to past and present dynamics in political life that emanate from around the world. The aim of the course is to think critically about news headlines and to make sense of and discern reality. Spring

PLSC437 (3)
Topics:
A study of selected topics in political science as announced in the class schedule. May be repeated with different topics.

PLSC440 Alt (3)
The Interfacing of Politics and Religion
Analyzes the interaction of politics and religion, including biblical comment on government, the views of governments and political activists toward religion, selected case studies regarding religion and the state, interpretation of the first amendment of the United States Constitution, and contemporary political/religious movements.

PLSC458 Alt(3)
American Political Thought
An Examination of American political thought from the revolutionary period to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources including the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, the Federalist and the writings of statesmen and theorists from the Civil War era, Progressive movement, New Deal and contemporary politics.

PLSC480 (3)
Senior Seminar
A capstone course for political science majors normally taken during the senior year, including the reading of classic works of political science and comprehensive review and assessment of the student's knowledge and understanding of the discipline. Spring
 

PLSC490 (2-9)
Internship
Students work part- or full-time with government agencies, elected government officials, political campaigns, private interest groups, or NGOs. A minimum of 60 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. Prerequisites: At least junior standing and consent of the department. Fall, Spring

PLSC495 (1-3)
Independent Study/Readings/Research
Individually directed study, readings, or research under the guidance of the instructor. Repeatable in a different area for up to 4 credits. Limited to students with majors in political science or social studies or a minor in political science. Registration by permission of instructor. Fall, Spring

PLSC498 (3)
Research Seminar
Introduction to political science research methodology, including bibliographical searches, critical evaluation of sources, surveys, and application of statistical data. Requires the writing of a paper based on original research. Fall
 

PLSC590 (1)
Independent Readings
Individual readings in a specified area under the guidance of an instructor. Repeatable to 3 credits. Fall, Spring


PHILOSOPHY

PHIL224 (3)
Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to basic philosophical issues, including the relationship of faith and reason, epistemology, the mind-body problem, determinism and free will, and ethics. Fall

PHIL320 Alt (3)
Critical Thinking
Designed to encourage independent thinking and to teach analytical and logical skills necessary for problem solving as well as understanding and evaluating the ideas and claims of others. Spring

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Berrien Springs, Michigan 49104